Jul 21, 2024  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Credit designation at right of title is expressed in (c) class hours per week, (l) lab or (d) discussion section hours per week, and (cr) number of credits per semester.

 

Geoscience

  
  • GEOS 200 - Foundations of Geology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Geoscience majors/minors, environmental engineering, energy management, anthropology, geography, and regional planning majors, biology majors (all tracks), or instructor permission.
    Introduces the geological sciences, including the study of the Earth’s interior; plate tectonics; minerals and crystallography; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and their cycling; geologic time; crustal deformation and. Laboratory exercises will emphasize hand-on learning of basic geology skills including mineral and rock identification, understanding the geometry of subsurface geologic structures, and topographic and geologic map reading. (Also offered as ENVE 200 . These courses may be substituted for each other and be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOS 202 - Quantitative Methods in the Geoscience


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: Geoscience or earth and space science education majors/ minors only, or instructor permission; must be taken after or concurrently with GEOS 200 
    A quantitative introduction to the geological sciences, including the study of the earth’s interior; plate tectonics; minerals and crystallography; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and their cycling; geologic time; crustal deformation; and earthquakes. Introduces students to foundational mathematical skills and techniques used in the geosciences.
  
  • GEOS 203 - Surficial Processes


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    Introduces students to the geological processes that shape the earth’s surface, from uplift and erosion of mountains to the transport of sediment and subsequent formation of sedimentary rocks. Focuses on the interaction of underlying tectonic forces with the natural cycles of the earth’s atmosphere and hydrosphere and the subsequent evolution of both landscape and surface deposits.
  
  • GEOS 204 - Historical Geology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200  
    An introduction to the historical development of geology as a scientific discipline and an overview of the methods used by geologists to reconstruct the Earth’s past history. Studies the rock and fossil record in lecture, lab, and field outcrops to discover how our planet formed, how plate tectonic activity shaped ocean basins and continents, how geologic processes created economic resources, and how the history of life is recorded by ancient rock deposits. Includes required field trips on weekends. (Offered as GEOS 351 before 2015-16.)
  
  • GEOS 301 - Mineralogy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    An introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry, physical properties, optical properties, and phase equilibria of minerals pertinent to geology and economic resources. Laboratory exercises focus on mineral identification and interpretation as well as analytical techniques such as x-ray diffractometry and optical microscopy
  
  • GEOS 302 - Structural Geology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grades of “C” or better in GEOS 200  
    A study of the geometry, kinematics, and dynamics of the primary structures of the earth’s crust. Focuses on the geometric relations between geologic contacts and surface topography, the description of primary structures such as foliations, lineations, folds and fractures, the constraints on crustal motions, and the relation between stress and strain. Students are introduced to the tools of rock mechanics and spherical geometry. The laboratory includes extensive work with geologic maps and profiles, the Brunton compass, and orthographic and stereographic projections. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends.
  
  • GEOS 303 - Field Geology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200  
    Principles and techniques of field geology with an emphasis on developing field skills using a Brunton compass, topographic maps, Jacobs staff, stereographic projections, field computers, and the global positioning system. Field projects involve techniques of field note taking, measuring and describing stratigraphic sections, bedrock mapping and analysis, environmental assessment, and construction of geologic maps and structure sections. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends.
  
  • GEOS 310 - Environmental Geology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 203 
    The study of human interactions with the earth from a geological perspective. An emphasis is placed on the scientific concepts necessary to understand these interactions, including groundwater flow, soil formation and destruction, waste disposal, geologic hazards, stream hydrology, climate change, and natural resources. Contemporary environmental issues are explored through primary scientific literature and news media. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends.
  
  • GEOS 311 - Geochemistry


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 111 , MATH 121 , grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    An introduction to low-temperature chemistry of the earth’s surface and near-surface; includes discussions of chemical activity, solution chemistry, organic geochemistry, trace elements, stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry, and the chemistry of natural waters.
  
  • GEOS 312 - Hydrogeology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grades of “C” or better in GEOS 200  
    An overview of groundwater geology, including flow equations, aquifer flow equation, aquifer parameter testing, groundwater sampling techniques, and remediation of groundwater pollution. Labs emphasize graphical and analytical solutions as well as computer modeling of groundwater flow systems. (Also offered as ENVE 312 . These courses may be substituted for each other and be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOS 313 - Environmental Geophysics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: MATH 105  or equivalent math placement score, GEOS 101  or GEOS 200  
    Introduces near surface geophysical methods for shallow subsurface imaging and mapping of geological and environmental features. Emphasizes electromagnetic methods such as ground penetrating radar and electrical methods such as resistivity and terrain conductivity and their application to geological and environmental problems. Includes hands-on research experience with an array of instruments for industry and academic-based applied geophysical research questions.
  
  • GEOS 323 - Geophysics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: PHYS 111 , MATH 121 , grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    An introduction to physics of the surface and interior of the solid earth, including earthquakes, propagation of earthquake waves, gravity field and interior structure, magnetic field and magnetic reversals, heat flow, geodesy, and tides. Techniques used for applied geophysical surveys are also examined.
  
  • GEOS 324 - Geology of Oil and Gas


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 203 
    An in-depth exploration of the geological processes that create oil and gas resources in sedimentary rocks. Students also learn specific techniques used in the oil and gas industry for locating and extracting oil and gas reserves and study the environmental impacts caused by their development. Students also gain an understanding of the limited nature of fossil fuels.
  
  • GEOS 341 - Planetary Geology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Corequisite: MATH 121 , PHYS 111  or instructor permission
    Materials, motions, and evolution of the solar system, with an emphasis on observational methods, mechanics, spatial relationships, geology, and origin of the solar system.
  
  • GEOS 342 - Stellar Astronomy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Corequisite: MATH 121 , PHYS 111  or instructor permission
    Evolution and nature of objects in the universe, including the Sun, stars, and galaxies. A study of methods for gathering astronomical data on motion, distance, and composition.
  
  • GEOS 345 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 301 
    Introduces the origins of metamorphic rocks in the context of plate tectonic activity, emphasizing melting and crystallization processes as well as metamorphic reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on rock identification and interpretation on hand sample and petrographic microscopy. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends.
  
  • GEOS 352 - Stratigraphy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 203 
    An introduction to the concepts and methods applied in defining and establishing the spatial and temporal relationships of stratigraphic units—the material packages of sediment/rock and the intervals of time that are derived from them. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends.
  
  • GEOS 353 - Paleontology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    An introduction to the study of prehistoric life, the process and products of organic evolution, and the utility of fossils as tools for solving geological and paleobiological problems. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends.
  
  • GEOS 354 - Geomorphology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 203 
    A study of the origin of the earth’s landforms, including relationship of geologic structure to landform types and role of geomorphic processes in landscape development.
  
  • GEOS 355 - Sedimentology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 301 
    A study of sediments and sedimentary rocks with emphasis on reconstruction of their origin, specifically depositional and post-burial history, from properties observed in outcrops, hand-specimens, and thin sections.
  
  • GEOS 356 - Coastal Processes and Geology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: GEOS 203 , geoscience majors/minors, and earth and space science education majors/minors, or instructor permission
    The study of the origin and evolution of coastal environments from a geological perspective. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative investigation of the dominant processes (waves, tides, and currents) that create and modify these environments, as well as the role of human-induced change. Contemporary issues in coastal geology are explored through primary scientific literature, news media, and laboratory exercises. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends.
  
  • GEOS 362 - Plate Tectonics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    Introduction to formal theory of plate tectonics. Topics include magnetic anomalies, first motion studies, thermal structures of the plates, kinematics, crustal generation, sea floor spreading, collision, and subduction deformation.
  
  • GEOS 363 - Volcanology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    Introduces volcanoes, volcanic eruption styles, and deposits in subaerial and submarine environments. Students assess risks and hazards associated with living near active volcanoes and discuss the cultural influences of volcanoes around the world throughout human history. Study of different types of volcanic eruptions through historical and pre-historical case studies. Laboratory exercises focus on rock identification and interpretation, fluid dynamics experiments, and learning laboratory and field skills of volcanologists that allow the determination of eruption dynamics.
  
  • GEOS 370 - Oceanography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    An introduction to physical, chemical, geological, and biological nature of the ocean: bathymetry, submarine geology, and sedimentary deposits. Includes field trip(s) that may occur on weekend(s).
  
  • GEOS 371 - Meteorology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    An introduction to meteorological sciences; composition and structure of the atmosphere; radiation principles; elementary thermodynamics and heat balance.
  
  • GEOS 401 - Northern Rockies Seminar


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200  and GEOS 202 ; instructor permission required
    A seminar introduction to the geology and tectonic history of the northern Rocky Mountains.  Includes instruction in the techniques of field mapping and geologic interpretation.  Designed to prepare students specifically for GEOS 402.
  
  • GEOS 402 - Northern Rockies Field Workshop


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOS 401  
    A field study of the major geologic features and relationships involved in the development of the northern Rocky Mountains.  National Park and Monument areas of South Dakota, Wyoming and Montana are included among the areas investigated.  (Three weeks, taught in the summer only.)
  
  • GEOS 403 - Newfoundland Seminar


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 ; instructor permission required
    A seminar introduction to the geology and tectonic history of Newfoundland and Labrador. Includes instruction in the methods and concepts employed in delineation and genetic interpretation of stratifraphic units. Designed to prepare students specifically for GEOS 404 .
  
  • GEOS 404 - Newfoundland Field Workshop


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOS 403 ; instructor permission and valid passport required
    A field course designed to utilize the exceptional and diverse geologic features of Newfoundland for instruction of departmental majors and minors in the tectonic analysis utilizing sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and paleontologic observations. (Three weeks, taught in the summer only.)
  
  • GEOS 405 - American Southwest Seminar


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Grades of “C” or better in GEOS 200 ; instructor permission required
    A seminar introduction to the geology of the American Southwest. Includes examination of Colorado Plateau stratigraphy, Basin and Range tectonism, and volcanic events in the eastern Sierra Nevada. Prepares students specifically for GEOS 406 .
  
  • GEOS 406 - American Southwest Field Workshop


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOS 405 ; instructor permission required
    A field study of the major geologic features and relationships exposed in the American Southwest, including the Colorado Plateau, the Rio Grande Rift, Death Valley, and parts of the eastern Sierra Nevada in California. (Three weeks, taught in the summer only.)
  
  • GEOS 407 - Carbonate Geology Seminar


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Grades of “C” or better in GEOS 200 ; instructor permission required
    A seminar introduction to the geological environment and history of the carbonate rocks and sediments found in Florida. Includes instruction in the techniques of field analysis and geologic interpretation. Prepares students specifically for GEOS 408 .
  
  • GEOS 408 - Carbonate Geology Field Workshop


    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOS 407 ; instructor permission
    Two to three weeks of field study in Florida Keys and at Andros Island, Bahamas. Conducted from base camps in Florida Keys and at Forfar Biological Field Station (Bahamas) and consists of both land and marine studies of the different carbonate environments in the Keys, Florida Bay, and along the Atlantic reef tract. Valid passport and basic swimming skills required.
  
  • GEOS 409 - Geology of Shale Gas—Field Workshop


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOS 119 
    Intensive laboratory and field-based investigations of the geology of shale gas energy formation, development and extraction. Explores the geological formation and history of natural gas found in deep shale deposits and investigates technology used to extract these from the subsurface and how economic, environmental, and political factors influence the development of shale gas resources. Includes travel to field-based locations and rig-floor environments.
  
  • GEOS 470 - Research Planning


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: 75cr or instructor permission
    Exposes students to the methods of research in the geosciences by working on a project of their choosing. Students begin their capstone research by planning and initiating a project of their choosing. Working with a faculty advisor, students define a problem, do the background research to discover what is already known about it, propose several working hypotheses to solve it, and then present their capstone research proposal along with a review of the relevant scientific literature.
  
  • GEOS 475 - Data Interpretation


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: GEOS 470 , Senior standing
  
  • GEOS 480 - Senior Research


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: GEOS 475 , senior standing
    Working closely with a research advisor, seniors complete their capstone research project and prepare a professional poster and oral presentation to effectively communicate their findings to an audience of faculty, alumni, and peers. Designed for seniors enrolled in all majors within the Geoscience Department.
  
  • GEOS 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    The department’s intention is to use this course to schedule extended field trips and for teaching special courses that utilize the specialties of the Geoscience faculty.
  
  • GEOS 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    Independent study provides an opportunity to use library, laboratory, or field research in an area that is of interest under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.
  
  • GEOS 490 - Field Studies in Geology


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-4

    Prerequisite: GEOS 301 ; instructor permission
    Field-based geologic research in a variety of locations across the United States and the world. Through hands-on application, students learn how to formulate a field hypothesis, use field equipment to collect geological observations and samples, keep a field notebook, and create visual depictions of field data in the form of maps or cross-sections.
  
  • GEOS 492 - Soils and Soil Geochemistry


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200 
    Introduces the ways in which archaeologists and geoscientists define, recognize, examine, and interpret soils in both the field and the laboratory. Examines (1) how the interactions of landform, topography, climate, and biota result in patterns of soil development and the distribution of soils that we observe within the landscape; (2) the significance of soils to other disciplines, including archaeology, Quaternary geology, and geoenvironmental science; and (3) how the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils are influenced by human activities both past and present. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends. (Offered as GEOS 313 before 2016-17.) (Also offered as ANTH 492 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOS 493 - Geoscience Internship


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-12

    Summer or semester work experience with cooperating firms or agencies. May be scheduled only after consultation with advisor and chairperson. Requirements include up to three on-site consultations, depending on credits and location’s site; completion of up to three oral progress reports; and submission of a detailed work diary. Restricted to junior and senior department majors; only 3cr may be applied toward major.

Gerontology

  
  • GERN 493 - Internship


    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Senior standing, all required courses
    Supervised experience in public or private agency that serves aging clients.

German

  
  • GRMN 101 - Elementary German I


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    For beginning students. Introduction to the German language emphasizing communication through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Focus on pronunciation and basic grammatical concepts to enable students to communicate in the present tense in a range of situations. They will be able to negotiate a limited number of personal needs and handle basic social interactions related to their daily lives. They become acquainted with a variety of cultural aspects of German-speaking countries. Attendance is required. May not register for or take a D/F repeat in GRMN 101 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered German course.
  
  • GRMN 102 - Elementary German II


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: GRMN 101  or equivalent
    A continuation of GRMN 101 . Emphasizing communication through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Focus on pronunciation and expansion of grammatical concepts to enable students to communicate in present, past, and future tenses in a variety of situations. Students will be able to negotiate a limited number of personal needs, handle a range of interactions related to their daily lives, and manage simple social transactions. They expand their cultural knowledge of German-speaking countries. Attendance is required. Liberal Studies credit is given. May not register for or take a D/F repeat in GRMN 102 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered German course.
  
  • GRMN 201 - Intermediate German


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: GRMN 102  or equivalent
    A continuation of GRMN 102 . Emphasizing communication through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Focus on pronunciation and expansion of grammatical concepts to enable students to communicate in present, past, and future tenses in a variety of situations. Students will be able to negotiate an increasing number of personal needs, handle a range of interactions related to their daily lives, and manage simple social situations and transactions. They expand their cultural knowledge of German-speaking countries. Attendance is required. Liberal Studies credit is given. May not register for or take a D/F repeat in GRMN 201 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered German course.
  
  • GRMN 220 - Intermediate German Conversation


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GRMN 201  or equivalent, or instructor permission
    Intensive work on oral communication skills with specific emphasis on spontaneous interpersonal speaking, discourse strategies, vocabulary building, and pronunciation. Required for all minors.
  
  • GRMN 230 - Intermediate German Composition and Grammar


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GRMN 201  or equivalent
    Intensive practice in written expression and communication in German together with a grammar review. Intermediate-level course with the goal of fostering writing in German for a variety of practical purposes. Review and expansion of specific grammar points are integrated into each unit. Taught in German.
  
  • GRMN 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • GRMN 372 - Childhood Enchantment: The Fairy Tale in German Culture and Literature


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Analyzes the role fairy tales have played in German culture and literature over time. Emphasizes the complex reflection of socio-political processes and realities in folk tales and literary fairy tales (Kunstmärchen), as well as the use of fairy tale motifs in other literary genres, film, the arts, and music, advertising, and everyday life. Topics to be discussed may include, but are not limited to, gender roles, family relationships, the motif of the quest, the depiction of heroes and heroines, the conflict between good and evil, crime and punishment, the idea of justice, altruism versus egotism, the fairy tale and politics, etc.        
  
  • GRMN 481 - Special Topic


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students. Designed to meet the special needs of a student group.
  
  • GRMN 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    Provides an opportunity to engage in an in-depth analysis of some topic dealing with the German language and culture through consultation with a faculty member.

Honors Business

  
  • HBUS 101 - Contemporary Business Issues


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to College of Business Honors Program
    An honors-level course in the Eberly College of Business enables eligible students to participate in advanced study in the freshman year. Provides the foundation of the integrative nature of the college’s majors by including seminar meetings discussing contemporary business issues with local, regional, and national alumni business leaders; research mentoring with college faculty and businesspeople; opportunities to provide service to the college, university, and the community; and the beginning of an electronic portfolio. Serves as the introduction to the college’s honors program that also includes a sophomore cluster, an honors junior block, and an honors senior capstone course.

History

  
  • HIST 106 - Samurai and Gongfu Heroes: Masculinity in East Asia


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores what it means to be a man, from the haohan of China to the Men of High Purpose of Japan and beyond. Analyses stories, films, and official histories that have encouraged Chinese and Japanese people to emulate the great heroes of the past and how these people and their stories have been re-used in modern Asia. (Also offered as ASIA 106 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • HIST 196 - Explorations in US History


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Interprets and analyzes the development of US history through a chronological survey of a historical era or a topical theme central to US history. Examines, where appropriate, the intersection of race and ethnicity, gender, and class. Emphasizes the recognition of historical patterns, the interconnectedness of historical events, and the incorporation of various subfields in the discipline of history. Successful completion of HIST 196 fulfills the Liberal Studies History requirement. HIST 197  and HIST 198  also fulfill this requirement, and any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.
  
  • HIST 197 - Explorations in European History


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Interprets and analyzes the development of European history through a chronological survey of a historical era or a topical theme central to European history. Examines, where appropriate, the intersection of race and ethnicity, gender, and class. Emphasizes the recognition of historical patterns, the interconnectedness of historical events, and the incorporation of various subfields in the discipline of history. Successful completion of 197 fulfills the Liberal Studies History requirement. HIST 196  and HIST 198  also fulfill this requirement, and any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.
  
  • HIST 198 - Explorations in Global History


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Interprets and analyzes the development of global history through a chronological survey of a historical era or a topical theme central to global history. Examines, where appropriate, the intersection of race and ethnicity, gender, and class. Emphasizes the recognition of historical patterns, the interconnectedness of historical events, and the incorporation of various subfields in the discipline of history. Successful completion of HIST 198 fulfills the Liberal Studies History requirement. HIST 196  and HIST 197  also fulfill this requirement, and any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.
  
  • HIST 201 - Western Civilization before 1600


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 3cr of college history, or current major in any of the following: history, history/pre-law, middle-level education grades 4-8/social studies specialization, or secondary social studies
    Examines the history of Western Civilization from its beginnings in the Ancient Near East to the Age of Discovery. Focuses on the major political, social, religious, and intellectual institutions in Western civilization to approximately 1600. 
  
  • HIST 202 - Western Civilization since 1600


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 3cr of college history, or current major in any of the following: history, history/pre-law, middle-level education grades 4-8/social studies specialization, or secondary social studies
    Development of Western civilization from the expansion of Europe to the present, including political, diplomatic, economic, social, and cultural areas. Introduces issues and interpretations encountered in upper-level courses. For history majors or by instructor’s permission.
  
  • HIST 204 - United States History to 1877


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 3cr of college history, or current major in any of the following: history, history/pre-law, middle-level education grades 4-8/social studies specialization, or secondary social studies
    An introduction to United States history from the Colonial period through Reconstruction, covering such main currents as the founding of American society, the American Revolution, the making of the Constitution, the market revolution, westward expansion, slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
  
  • HIST 205 - United States History since 1877


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 3cr of college history, or current major in any of the following: history, history/pre-law, middle-level education grades 4-8/social studies specialization, or secondary social studies
    An introduction to United States history, 1877 to the present, covering such main currents as industrialization, Progressivism, World War I, the Great Depression and New Deal, World War II and the Cold War, the 1960s, the Vietnam War, and post-Vietnam political, social, and economic developments.
  
  • HIST 206 - The History of East Asia


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    History of China and Japan from ancient times, Buddhism, medieval Japan, Chinese communism, industrialization, and the modern Pacific Rim. Some consideration of peripheral Asia.
  
  • HIST 207 - The History of the Middle East


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    History of the Middle East from the late Byzantine and Sassanid period, Islam, medieval Islamic civilization and the rise of early modern dynasties, European imperialism, the origins of modern nation states, and the contemporary Middle East.
  
  • HIST 215 - The Researcher As Detective


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Introduces students to the uses of evidence in the construction of historical narrative and to the standard practices of the historian.
  
  • HIST 217 - Different Ways of Looking at the Past


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Introduces different theoretical lenses that historians have used for viewing the past. Provides an overview of the different ways that our view of the past has changed over the course of the twentieth century.
  
  • HIST 218 - Right In Your Own Backyard: How To Do Local History


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Introduction to historical methods and best research practices for conducting local history projects.
  
  • HIST 219 - Historians and the Public: Preserving and Presenting the Past


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Examines the way historians serve as the intermediary between the public and their understanding of the past in a public setting.  Explores how history is preserved and presented by historians, from historic sites and museums to virtual exhibits and documentary film-making.
  
  • HIST 220 - Visual Sources in History


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Examines cartoons, posters, comics and other visual media that have been used as fonns of social criticism and propaganda throughout history and that are a valuable source of information for scholars and teachers. Locate and analyze these sources for use in research and teaching.
  
  • HIST 221 - The Historian’s Craft


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: BA History majors
    Explores the various careers of historians and history-related fields.
  
  • HIST 230 - Queer Global History


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Analyzes the historical and global understanding of the concept of “queerness.” Emphasizes the historical development of a queer identity and the modern creation or a queer community, focusing on comparing different modern notions of queerness and the LGBTQ+ struggle for equal rights.
  
  • HIST 231 - History of Jerusalem


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the history of the city of Jerusalem from the ancient world until the present, examining the significance of the city to contemporary conflicts in the Middle East.
  
  • HIST 232 - Stalin and Hitler and the Terror State


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the historical understanding of Joseph Stalin and Adolph Hitler and the totalitarian states that they created. Emphasizes their influence on domestic and international events from the 1920s through the 1950s.
  
  • HIST 239 - Witches and Witch Hunts 1400-1800


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines witch trials and hunts in early modern Europe and Colonial America, from a wide range of perspectives including gender, religion, and economics, with emphasis on the marginalization of the accused.
  
  • HIST 240 - Zombies: A Cultural History of Death, Disease, and Technology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the concept of the Zombie throughout history and across cultures, and the way the figure of the Zombie has served as a metaphor for deeper personal and communal fears, such as death, nuclear war, global pandemics, and out of control technology.
  
  • HIST 245 - History and Climate Change


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the factors that have altered Earth’s climate in ways that shaped human history. Examines climate phenomena such as the Little Ice Age and El Nino events, with primary focus on anthropogenic climate change. Compares science and history as complementary tools that allow an understanding of this complex issue.
  
  • HIST 251 - United States Military History


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Not applicable toward the history major
    A survey of the history and transformation of the American military from the Colonial period to the present time. American military history is analyzed within the context of the nation’s political, social, economic, and cultural development. Central themes include war making, civil-military relations, and military professionalism.
  
  • HIST 265 - The History of Power: Its Uses and Abuses


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the many forms that power has taken in the past, from the soft power of persuasion to the hard power of law and government. Focuses on Western Europe and the United States, from the Renaissance to the mid-twentieth century, and on issues of political control, race, and gender.
  
  • HIST 295 - Introduction to Historical Studies


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: History, history/pre-law, or social studies education majors
    First of a two-course sequence. Introduces students to the study of history, analysis of primary and secondary sources, historical interpretation and historical writing. The student is encouraged to become a better critical thinker and historian.
  
  • HIST 302 - History of Ancient Rome


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Traces Roman history from early Republic down to fall of Empire. Roman political theory is particularly emphasized.
  
  • HIST 303 - Medieval Europe I, 400-1000


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    History of early Medieval Europe, from decline of Rome to beginnings of High Middle Ages; emphasis on political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual developments.
  
  • HIST 304 - Medieval Europe II, 1000-1300


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    History of late Medieval Europe, from High Middle Ages to Renaissance period; emphasis on political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual developments.
  
  • HIST 305 - Renaissance and Reformation


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    History of Europe from approximately 1250; rise of commercial city, kings, and pressures on Christian Church to 1600. Some consideration of technology and voyages.
  
  • HIST 306 - Early Modern Europe


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Greatness of France under Louis XIV; Sweden; Thirty Years’ War. Emergence of modern society; French Revolution.
  
  • HIST 307 - History of Europe: 1815-1914


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    The study of Europe in 19th century, with emphasis on the emergence of major thought patterns, Romanticism, Nationalism, Socialism, and Positivism.
  
  • HIST 311 - Rise and Fall of Hitler’s Empire


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    An in-depth study of Hitler and the Nazi order; offers an analysis of 19th-century origins of Nazi ideology and intensively analyzes domestic and foreign totalitarian policy (1920-1945), including Holocaust, Resistance, and the postwar Nuremberg Trials.
  
  • HIST 312 - Europe, 1914-1945: The Age of Dictators and Imperiled Democracies


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Surveys the principal themes in the transformation of Europe from 1914 to 1945. Topics include World War I and the Paris Peace settlement; developments in conservatism, liberalism, and socialism; colonial empires; the emergence of communism, fascism, and Nazism; artistic, musical, and literary movements between the two World Wars; the Great Depression and responses to it; anti-Semitism and the Shoah; the Spanish Civil War, appeasement, and World War II; and the seeds of decolonization and the Cold War.
  
  • HIST 313 - Europe Since 1945: Division, Revolution, and Unity


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Surveys the principal themes in European history since 1945. Topics include postwar reconstruction, the origins of the Cold War in Europe, the long years of economic growth followed by stagnation, decolonization of the British and French empires, the events of 1968 and their consequences, the experience of communism in the East Bloc, the revolutions of 1989, and progress toward European integration.
  
  • HIST 320 - History of England to 1688


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    A survey of the growth of the English nation, with emphasis on political, social, and economic developments leading to 17th-century conflict between Crown and Parliament.
  
  • HIST 322 - French Revolution and Napoleon


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Brief sketch of Old Regime, concentration on Revolution and Empire, with emphasis on politics, social structure, diplomacy, and economics.
  
  • HIST 323 - France, 1815 to the Present


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    A survey of French history from the end of the Napoleonic era to the present. Pays special attention to the revolutionary tradition in politics, changes in the lives of workers and peasants, the French experience in the two world wars, and recent social and political trends.
  
  • HIST 325 - History of Germany: 1845-Present


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; HIST 196 , HIST 197 , or HIST 198  (non-majors)
    Study of the political and cultural development of modern Germany from the Revolution of 1848, including imperial, republican, and totalitarian phases, to post-World War II East and West Germany. 
  
  • HIST 326 - History of Russia


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    A general survey of Russian history, culture, and institutions. Special consideration given to the study of historical forces formative of Revolution of 1917.
  
  • HIST 327 - Soviet Union and Contemporary Russia


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Analyzes the period from 1855 to the present, including the attempts at modernization by Imperial Russia, the creation of the Soviet Union and further modernization, and the collapse of the Soviet Union.
  
  • HIST 331 - Modern Middle East


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 3cr of college history
    A survey of changes that have taken place in Middle East and in Islam since 18th century and of contemporary problems in that region.
  
  • HIST 332 - History of Early China


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 3cr of college history
    China from the dawn of time to the Tang Dynasty. Focuses on the creation of the intellectual and political systems that have dominated China and East Asia down to the present. Looks in depth at the origins of Chinese philosophy and the imperial system.
  
  • HIST 333 - Vietnam in War and Revolution


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Focuses on 20th C Vietnamese experiences with war and revolution and their impact on society. Examines indigenous forms of anti-colonial resistance, the rise of communism and nationalism, and Vietnamese experiences in the wars against France and the United States.
  
  • HIST 334 - History of Modern China


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 3cr of college history
    The history of China from the late Ming to the present. The Late Imperial political, economic, and social systems and the problems they faced in the 19th century. Reforming China from the Self-Strengthening to Mao. Revolutionary society and its discontents. The reform era and China today.
  
  • HIST 337 - History of Modern Japan


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    The history of Japan from the beginning of the Tokugawa period to the present. Japan’s early modern political, economic, and social systems; its transformation in the Meiji era; and the Japanese people’s struggles and successes in the 20th century.
  
  • HIST 338 - The History of Iran


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Focuses on aspects of Iranian history from the Achaemenid period until the present that are significant for the formation of modern Iranian identity. Uses primary sources, secondary readings, literature, and film to analyze the development of Iranian identity as well as modern perceptions of Iran. Emphasis on ancient Iranian culture and religion, the story of Iranian wars with the Greeks and Romans, how Iran became Muslim, and the development of contemporary Iranian religion and politics.
  
  • HIST 339 - Jihad and the Origins of Islamist Movements in the Middle East


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, 3cr of college history
    Discusses the concept of “jihad” in Islamic history: its origins, development, and historical deployment by groups within the Muslim community. Analyzes the history and origins of groups such as al-Qaeda, the Taliban, and ISIS and considers whether these groups are “medieval” or actually modern products of globalization. (Also offered as PLSC 339 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
 

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