Oct 04, 2023  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Credit designation at right of title is expressed in (c) class hours per week, (l) lab or (d) discussion section hours per week, and (cr) number of credits per semester.

 

Child Development and Family Relations

  
  • CDFR 322 - Early Care and Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CDFR 218  and previous 200- and 300-level child development and family relations courses
    Introduces the historical background of the fields of childcare and early childhood education and current educational issues and theories affecting the field. Includes curricula models, frameworks for curricula, research on the impact of early childhood experience, and diversity and inclusion issues.
  
  • CDFR 323 - Family Issues


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CDFR 224  
    Examines major social and family problems that families manage (e.g., marginalization, caring for elders) and the role of professionals in supporting families. Reviews strategies to promote family resilience, supportive programs, and family policies.
  
  • CDFR 410 - Infant and Toddler Development


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CDFR 218  and CDFR 310 ; compliance with current agency regulations; or instructor permission
    A study of characteristic developmental changes of human infants and toddlers from birth to approximately 36 months. Participation as teacher assistant in the infant/toddler childcare center provides experience in developmentally appropriate guidance and programming for very young children.
  
  • CDFR 411 - Family and Community


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CDFR 218 , CDFR 224 , CDFR 310 , CDFR 315 , CDFR 323 ; compliance with current agency regulation and enrolled in major/minor or instructor permission
    A study of community agencies and their service to families. Covers advocating for children and families, identifying community agencies that aid families in need, examining the professional code of ethics and ethical decision making, and recognizing signs of trouble within families and referring them appropriately. Community service and agency speakers are integrated into course work. Participation in a community service project is a mandatory part of the course. Completion of this course with a grade of “C” or better is required for graduation.
  
  • CDFR 420 - Infant Toddler Mental Health


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CDFR 410 
    An introduction and overview of Infant Mental Health. Focuses on strengths in infants and families, a relational framework for assessment and intervention, and a prevention orientation. Emphasizes an understanding of how principles of infant mental health provide a foundation for working with children and families across settings and disciplines.
  
  • CDFR 425 - Adolescence: Risk and Resiliency


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CDFR 323  and grade of “C” or better in CDFR 218  or instructor permission 
    Focuses on the development of preadolescents and adolescents as well as the challenges involved in parenting adolescents. Emphasizes identifying risk factors, protective factors, promotive factors, and resiliency when working with adolescents and their families in the field of human services.
  
  • CDFR 426 - Techniques of Parent Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CDFR 323  or instructor permission
    An examination of the nature, extent, and significance of parent education and parent involvement. Students become knowledgeable of the diverse and complex characteristics and needs of families. Enables students to identify the interrelationships of home, school, and community agencies to enhance collaboration and cooperation. Students identify methods, programs, and curricula to increase communication with parents and families.
  
  • CDFR 427 - Administration of Human Service Programs


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CDFR 310  or instructor permission
    Facilitates the acquisition of special knowledge and competencies needed by successful administrators of human service programs, including proposal writing, budgeting and management, staff selection and training, and program evaluation.
  
  • CDFR 428 - Family Dynamics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CDFR 224 , CDFR 310 , CDFR 323 ; and enrolled in major or instructor permission
    Emphasizes processes and models of family development topics, including an understanding of the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships with an emphasis on how the theoretical frameworks of family studies can aid in this understanding. Focuses on approaches and dynamics of principles related to familial and marital adjustment and coping, with an emphasis on understanding the strengths and weaknesses of families and how family members relate to each other.
  
  • CDFR 429 - Teaching in Community Settings


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite:
    CDFR 310 ,CDFR 321 , compliance with current agency regulations and 90+ credits or instructor permission
    Participation as a teacher assistant in an approved community early care or school age program provides experience in developmentally appropriate guidance and programming for children and youth. Applies principles and concepts from developmental science as the major focus . Emphasizes techniques of planning developmentally appropriate activities and utilizing positive guidance with groups of diverse children .
  
  • CDFR 430 - Poverty and Human Development


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CDFR 425 
    Examines the measurement and perception of socioeconomic status in the United States with an emphasis on poverty. Facilitates the discussion of research, theory, and policy related to poverty and human development.
  
  • CDFR 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students.
  
  • CDFR 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    Upper-level students with high scholastic achievement pursue their particular interests outside the realm of the organized home economics education curriculum. Repeatable: May be taken more than once to a maximum of 3cr. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.
  
  • CDFR 493 - Internship


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 6 to 12
    Credits: 6-12

    Prerequisite: Permission of child development and family relations program, human development, fashion, and interior design department, and college dean; completion of at least 75cr; minimum GPA of 2.5 in major; compliance with current agency regulations; and enrolled in major
    Practical field experience related to the student’s major area of study. Specific objectives are developed individually in consultation with the internship coordinator and/or university faculty member who supervises the internship. Logs and major paper required. Repeatable: May be taken for 6 to 12 credits.

Chemistry

  
  • CHEM 100 - Preparatory Chemistry


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Corequisite: CHEM 111  
    Discusses fundamental terminology, calculations, and concepts of chemistry. For students without appropriate math placement or who have limited preparation in chemistry. Provides support for students enrolled in CHEM 111  and may not be used toward any major, minor or Liberal Studies. Restricted to students in the Kopchick College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and the College of Health and Human Services. Students who have earned a “C” or better in a higher number chemistry course may not take this course.
  
  • CHEM 101 - College Chemistry I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 4

    Basic principles and concepts of inorganic chemistry are developed using atomic and molecular structure with illustrative examples from descriptive chemistry. The laboratory portion illustrates physical and chemical properties in a qualitative and quantitative manner. For selected majors within the College of Health and Human Services and to fulfill the Liberal Studies Natural Science Laboratory Sequence requirement.
  
  • CHEM 102 - College Chemistry II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 101  or CHEM 111 
    Fundamental principles and concepts of organic chemistry and biochemistry are studied. Deals primarily with structural features of organic compounds, the chemistry of functional groups, and practical examples and uses of organic compounds. The laboratory portion illustrates properties and reactions of representative organic compounds. For selected majors within the College of Health and Human Services and to fulfill the Liberal Studies Natural Science Laboratory Sequence requirement.
  
  • CHEM 103 - Introduction to Chemistry for Health Sciences


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 4

    Survey of key concepts of general and organic chemistry, with special emphasis on the application of these concepts to the health professions. Topics include measurements, chemical equations, gasses, solutions, acids and bases, hydrocarbons and organic functional groups. Course includes a laboratory component that focuses on quantitative skills. For selected majors within the College of Health and Human Services and to fulfill the Liberal Studies natural science laboratory requirement.
  
  • CHEM 105 - The Forensic Chemistry of CSI


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    For students who would like to learn about forensic chemistry and the basic science needed to understand it. Chemical concepts on the level of an introductory chemistry course and their applications to forensic science are explored in detail. Topics include the forensic analysis of drugs, fi bers, glass, fi ngerprints, arson, questioned documents, and other types of physical evidence. Other topics include how forensic science is portrayed in novels, movies, computer games, and TV and the methods used in forensic evidence collection at a crime scene. Course cannot be used to fulfi ll the requirements for a chemistry major or minor
  
  • CHEM 107 - Chemistry of Food and Beverages


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces the key concepts of general, organic, and biochemistry explained by their roles in food and beverages. Includes elements, molecules, bonding, functional groups and structural geometry, acids and bases, chemical equations and reactions, solutions, and gases. For non-science majors to fulfill the Liberal Studies natural science requirement.
  
  • CHEM 111 - General Chemistry I


    Credits: 4

    An introductory course for science and preprofessional health majors. First half of a two-semester sequence designed to give students the foundation of knowledge and laboratory techniques required to successfully complete a degree program in the sciences or gain entry into professional health programs. Topics include atomic theory, an introduction to chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, and molecular geometry.
  
  • CHEM 112 - General Chemistry II


    Credits: 4

    An introductory course for science and preprofessional health majors. Second half of a two-semester sequence designed to give students the foundation of knowledge and laboratory techniques required to successfully complete a degree program in the sciences, or gain entry into professional health programs. Topics include the solid states, solution theory, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, acids and bases, and electrochemistry
  
  • CHEM 113 - Advanced General Chemistry I


    Credits: 4

    and solid state, and solution theory. Topics are covered in greater depth and with more challenging problem solving than General Chemistry. For majors within the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and to fulfill the Liberal Studies Natural Science Laboratory Sequence requirement for those students.
  
  • CHEM 114 - Advanced General Chemistry II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CHEM 113 
    A continuation of Advanced General Chemistry I. Topics include solutions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics, acids and bases, buffers, and electrochemistry. Topics are covered in greater depth and with more challenging problem solving than General Chemistry. For majors within the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and to fulfill the Liberal Studies Natural Science Laboratory Sequence requirement for those students.
  
  • CHEM 231 - Organic Chemistry I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 4
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 112  or CHEM 114 
    A study of compounds of carbon, with a special emphasis on structure-reactivity relationships. Laboratory work emphasizes methods of separation and purification of organic compounds.
  
  • CHEM 255 - Biochemistry for Health Sciences


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 103   or instructor permission
    Introductory course for selected students in the College of Health and Human Services that focuses on the fundamentals of biochemistry. Provides a basic understanding of biomolecular processes so that this knowledge can be utilized to understand current and future aspects of molecular therapeutics. For selected majors within the College of Health and Human Services and to fulfill the Liberal Studies natural science nonlaboratory requirement.
  
  • CHEM 290 - Chemistry Seminar I


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Chemistry major or instructor permission
    Provides knowledge to students concerning undergraduate research and career possibilities based on a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Much of this class consists of presentations to students by research faculty in chemistry, biochemistry, and other departments across the university.
  
  • CHEM 314 - Inorganic Chemistry


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 112  or CHEM 114  
    Surveys chemical compounds and conceptual models. Includes symmetry and bonding theory, acid-base models, solids, coordination and organometallic complexes and bioinorganic chemistry. The laboratory portion builds on experimental skills and provides hands-on examples of lecture concepts.
  
  • CHEM 325 - Analytical Chemistry I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 231 
    An introduction to the principles of analytical chemistry, including gravimetric, volumetric, and basic instrumental analysis. Special emphasis is placed on both perfecting the student’s laboratory technique and on the application of general chemical knowledge through problem solving.
  
  • CHEM 326 - Analytical Chemistry II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 325 , CHEM 341 
    A more detailed examination of the principles of analytical chemistry. Student learns theoretical and practical aspects of sampling, data acquisition, and spectroscopic, electrochemical, chromatographic, thermal, mass spectrometric, and affinity methods of analysis.
  
  • CHEM 332 - Organic Chemistry II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 4
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 231 
    A continuation of Organic Chemistry I, with an introduction to spectroscopic techniques. Laboratory work emphasizes the synthesis of representative compounds.
  
  • CHEM 341 - Physical Chemistry I


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 ; MATH 126 ; grade of “C” or better in CHEM 112  or CHEM 114 
    Foundations of chemical thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy.
  
  • CHEM 343 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CHEM 341  (may be taken concurrently)
    Experiments illustrating application of fundamental laws to actual systems.
  
  • CHEM 351 - Biochemistry


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 231 
    A study of chemistry and biological functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, minerals, vitamins, and hormones.
  
  • CHEM 390 - Chemistry Seminar II


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CHEM 290  or CHEM 332  or instructor permission
    Presents the skills necessary to design research proposals, to search for and apply to pre- and post-degree external academic research experiences and workplace opportunities, and to understand their roles and expectations for ethical research and publications.
  
  • CHEM 401 - Advanced Chemistry Lab


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 6
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 332  or instructor permission
    Application and analysis of advanced laboratory techniques for chemistry majors. Topics will be taken from across chemistry, and students will use techniques such as synthesis, physical characterization, computation, spectroscopy and electrochemistry to gain experience with a wide spectrum of chemical techniques. An in-depth project is included in this course.
  
  • CHEM 411 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 314 , CHEM 341 
    Discussion of advanced theories of atomic structure, chemical bonding, acids and bases, coordination compounds, and selected topics. In the laboratory portion, techniques used in the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds are explored.
  
  • CHEM 431 - Organic Molecular Structure Determination


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 231 -CHEM 332  (CHEM 332  may be taken concurrently) 
    Examines modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR. Discusses the fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method. Focuses on structure determination by interpretation of data (spectra), either individually or combined. Emphasizes structure determination as currently applied in the chemical industry.
  
  • CHEM 435 - Current Topics in Organic Chemistry


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 332  and CHEM 341 
    Selected topics of current interest covered. Possible topics include reaction mechanisms, molecular spectroscopy, stereochemistry, natural products, heterocyclics, polymer chemistry, and organic synthesis.
  
  • CHEM 442 - Advanced Physical Chemistry


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 341 , MATH 225  (may be taken concurrently) In-depth exploration and applications of chemical thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy.
    Indepth exploration and applications of chemical thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy.
  
  • CHEM 444 - Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CHEM 343 ; must be taken after or concurrent with CHEM 442 
    An extension of CHEM 343 ; experiments related to chemical kinetics, molecular spectroscopy, and other topics of physical chemistry.
  
  • CHEM 450 - Industrial Chemistry


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 112  or CHEM 114  or instructor approval
    Introduces industrial chemistry. Explores unit operations, unit processes, equipment in the chemical industry, diagrams for understanding chemical processes, fundamentals of material and thermal/heat balance, principles of process design, and separation processes design. Examines organic and inorganic manufacturing processes.
  
  • CHEM 460 - Chemistry and Physics of Materials


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 112  or CHEM 114  and PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 
    Provides unified treatment of materials. Emphasizes physical and chemical origins of material properties. Multidisciplinary approach using chemistry, physics, and geoscience to study bonding and crystal chemistry. An interdisciplinary approach to the study of material phenomena involving electronic devices, energy storage, second harmonic generation, superconductivity, and others.
  
  • CHEM 461 - Modern Diffraction


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 112  or CHEM 114  and PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 
    Investigates advances in crystallography and its applications to modern science. Emphasizes powder diffraction, including Rietveld analysis. Develops proficiency in data collection, phase analysis, and structure refinement and shows how crystallographic science can address scientific problems.
  
  • CHEM 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students.
  
  • CHEM 490 - Chemistry Senior Seminar


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CHEM 390  
    A discussion of recent trends in chemical thought. Oral and written reports on assigned readings, library, or laboratory research. Guest lecturers. A seminar course to provide knowledge to students regarding effective oral and written scientific communication. Students refine their skills in reading and evaluating research papers from the literature, write a formal research paper, and present a research seminar. The combination of CHEM 390  and CHEM 490 counts as one writing-intensive course. (Also offered as BIOC 490 . These courses may be substituted for each other and be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.)
  
  • CHEM 493 - Internship in Chemistry


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 4-9

    Prerequisite: CHEM 111  or CHEM 113 , CHEM 112  or CHEM 114 , CHEM 231 , CHEM 232, CHEM 321, CHEM 341 , junior status, and departmental approval
    Full-time involvement in an actual “on-the-job” situation in an industrial or research laboratory under the tutelage of a selected preceptor. A department faculty member works closely with the student and preceptor and assumes responsibility for making the final evaluation and assigning a grade.
  
  • CHEM 498 - Problems in Chemistry


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-2

    Prerequisite: CHEM 231  and permission of chairperson
    Supervised undergraduate research, in conjunction with a faculty member in the Chemistry Department.

Chinese

  
  • CHIN 101 - Elementary Chinese I


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    For beginning students. Introduces the Chinese language, with attention focused on the three modes of communication: interpretive listening and reading, interpersonal speaking and writing, and presentational speaking and writing. Students learn pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, and how to write approximately 250 characters. Also imparts knowledge of Chinese culture and society. Attendance is required. May not register for or take a D/F repeat in CHIN 101 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered Chinese course.
  
  • CHIN 102 - Elementary Chinese II


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHIN 101 
    A continuation of Elementary Chinese I, focusing on the three modes of communication—interpretive listening and reading, interpersonal speaking and writing, and presentational speaking and writing—to build proficiency in using the Chinese language in real-life situations. Also imparts knowledge of Chinese culture and society. Attendance is required. May not register for or take a D/F repeat in CHIN 102 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered Chinese course.
  
  • CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHIN 102 
    A continuation of previous work on the three modes of communication: interpretive listening and reading, interpersonal speaking and writing, and presentational speaking and writing, so that students can function in everyday situations. Also imparts knowledge of Chinese culture and society. Liberal Studies credit is given. Attendance is required. May not register for or take a D/F repeat in CHIN 201 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered Chinese course.
  
  • CHIN 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students. Designed to meet the special needs of a student group.
  
  • CHIN 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students. Designed to meet the special needs of a student group.
  
  • CHIN 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students. Designed to meet the special needs of a student group.

College of Arts and Humanities

  
  • ARHU 122 - Big Ideas I: Ancient to Enlightenment


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces transformative literature from around the world, ancient to enlightenment periods. Develops foundational reading, writing, and analytical skills, as well as productive habits of mind. Integrates and embeds the humanities, providing preparation for and an advantage in the workplace.
  
  • ARHU 123 - Big Ideas II: Enlightenment to Present


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Surveys transformative literature from around the world, enlightenment to present. Develops foundational reading, writing, and analytical skills, as well as productive habits of mind. Integrates and embeds the humanities, providing preparation for and an advantage in the workplace.
  
  • ARHU 142 - Introduction to Secondary Social Studies Education


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Secondary Social Studies Education or History Majors in first year of study or with the consent of instructor.
    Introduces the foundational concepts and practices in social studies education, the vocabulary of social studies education, and the qualities and best practices of an effective social studies educator.
  
  • ARHU 342 - Social Studies Teaching Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 1
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: EDUC 242  and currently enrolled in EDUC 342  
    A laboratory experience providing the opportunity to explore and experiment with strategies and methodologies connected with teaching in the various disciplines of the social studies. Offers hands-on experience with public school students in a controlled setting. Allows students to experience middle and high school settings as well as build a repertoire of social studies teaching methodologies that enables them to complete EDUC 342  more effectively.
  
  • ARHU 343 - Applied Practice in Secondary English Language Arts


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: EDUC 242  
    Corequisite: Concurrent with EDUC 342  
    In conjunction with EDUC 342 , prepares candidates for field experience in secondary English language arts. Students continue to develop skills for school-site observation, are introduced to philosophical models of classroom management, and receive instruction about completing the Step 2 portfolio requirement. Provides opportunity for students to apply understanding of pedagogical content knowledge to observation and lesson design and to familiarize themselves with teacher research methodology.
  
  • ARHU 461 - Big Ideas Capstone


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; Big Ideas certificate; 2.5 cumulative grade point average; Certificate director’s approval
    Supervised experience in conjunction with IUP course work, lab work, or in a public/private organization that compliments on-going research by situating that work within a humanities and liberal arts context and a public presentation.

Communications Media

  
  • COMM 101 - Introduction to Communications, Media, and Culture


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Required of communications media majors. An introduction to the evolution, status, and future of communications media. Explores intrapersonal communication through self-assessment, values clarification, and feedback; interpersonal communication through interviews, observations, case studies, and gaming; and mass communications through the examination of the processes and the technology utilized to disseminate and manage information. Career paths, field applications, professional associations, and the primary literature are investigated.
  
  • COMM 143 - Media Wellness


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Helps students understand how media affects wellness. Analyzes and evaluates media consumption and media effects (both positive and negative) in a variety of genres including traditional and social media. Explores concepts of media literacy including evaluation and analysis of media content. Successful completion of this course fulfills the Liberal Studies Dimensions of Wellness requirement. Other 143 courses also fulfill this requirement, and any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.
  
  • COMM 150 - Media Aesthetics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105  

    Examines the theoretical assumptions of sight, sound, and motion as applied to the design of communication products for different media formats. Demonstrates strategies for creative composition. Discusses psychological and physiological implications of images.
  
  • COMM 151 - Basic Lighting for Still and Motion Imagery


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Examines the basic technical and design aspects of artificial and natural lighting in capturing still and motion imagery. Emphasizes mastery of the terminology and simulation of lighting concepts and conditions through virtual lighting software.
  
  • COMM 201 - Internet and Multimedia


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BTED/COSC 101 /IFMG 101  or prior exposure to word processing and electronic mail
    Focuses on the evaluation of information and multimedia resources available on electronic networks when doing research in an area of one’s choice. Information literacy course for students to gain a more in-depth understanding of the information resources available electronically and of how to utilize them more effectively in communicating. Students learn how to access and utilize these resources for two-way communications and support for decision making while incorporating selected elements in multimedia presentations of their own design. (BTED/COMM/COSC 201 /IFMG/LIBR 201  may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats and may not be counted for duplicate credit.)
  
  • COMM 205 - Making Presentations with Media


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101 
    An introduction to basic presentation skills, emphasizing the use of media to enhance presentations. Students research, organize, and write presentations; design appropriate media; and deliver individual and team presentations.
  
  • COMM 206 - History and Theory of Making Games


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 150 
    Explores the origins of games and game play into the contemporary era of video and electronic games. Introduces the history of the games industry and the process of how games are created. Analyze games through an ethical and developmental framework, as well as explores how games are used for entertainment, teaching, and training.
  
  • COMM 207 - Online Media Production


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines the development and production of media for online applications such as video sharing and social media sites. Discusses management, as well as the fiscal, ethical, and technological issues surrounding online media. Requires students to complete a production project where they develop and produce audio, video and other digital media components for online distribution for a social media campaign.
  
  • COMM 230 - Global Media and Communication


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Provides an overview of global media and international communications. Describes how international communication and development of global media has influenced relationships among nations and among people with different cultural backgrounds. Covers social, economic and political situations prior to and after globalization, which include global issues that intersects with media ownership, access to media, and the impact of media communications on culture and people living in developed and developing countries. Analyzes how understanding global media and communication can enhance students to think critically, respect their own identities, history and culture as well as others.
  
  • COMM 240 - Communications Graphics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 , communications media major or minor, photography and digital imaging certificate or digital history certificate enrollment or permission
    An introduction to graphic design concepts and related processes and techniques for a variety of forms of presentation media including television, multimedia, and online communications for educational, corporate training, and communications specialists. Both two- and three-dimensional design and basic animation concepts are explored. Hands-on experiences using a variety of graphic software applications.
  
  • COMM 249 - Basic Audio Production


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 , communications media major or minor, popular music studies certificate, audio production certificate, or digital history certificate enrollment or permission
    Theory and practice of audio production, developing an understanding of the techniques of audio recording as well as the ability to make sound recordings. Addresses recording and mixing techniques and the use of audio software. Offers exposure to recording for various media. Provides hands-on experience through labs and projects to be completed outside of class.
  
  • COMM 251 - Television Production


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 , communications media major or minor, photography and digital imaging certificate enrollment or permission
    Develops basic skills in television production and direction. Consideration of operating problems of a television studio, as well as functions, limitations, and capabilities of television equipment and facilities.
  
  • COMM 261 - Teamwork and Communication Skills for College and Career


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on developing teamwork and communication skills for the presentation of career-oriented, technically rich information. Applies foundational theories of communication and the rhetoric of public communication and use that understanding to present academic research, data, and technical information orally and in written form. Prepares students to engage audiences, frame and present arguments, and develop the ability to present their topic and its significance in technical and non-technical settings. Explores different types of presentation situations including team oral presentations, team written reports, poster session presentations, platform presentations, symposia, and panel discussions. Prepares students to produce appropriate media to supplement their presentations. Presentations are video recorded for individual, peer, and instructor evaluation.
  
  • COMM 270 - Sport Communication


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 101  
    Provides an overview of sport communication, focusing on different communicative  contexts including interpersonal, organizational, and public communication. Emphasizes  media relations and the skills essential for sport communication professionals, including  handling media interactions, crises, and integration of positive public relation strategies. (Also offered as KHSS 270 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • COMM 271 - Beginning Photography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 , communications media major or minor, interior design major, photography and digital imaging certificate or digital history certificate enrollment or permission
    Develops students’ abilities in the practice and application of photography as a tool for communications and as a creative pursuit. Emphasizes proper technical skills and creative application of the medium. Covers topics such as camera operation, image editing, and image analysis.
  
  • COMM 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • COMM 302 - Research in Communications Media


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 150 , ENGL 101  and ENGL 202  (grade of “C” or better)
    Provides knowledge of the resource materials and research strategies used in the communications media field. Students design basic data gathering instruments, collect data, and assimilate information from various sources and data into communication products, services, or documents.
  
  • COMM 303 - Scriptwriting


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 ; ENGL 101  and ENGL 202  (grades of “C” or better) or permission
    An introduction to the design of media materials and script writing. Style and techniques of writing are analyzed. Classroom emphasis is on writing critiques, and revision of designs and scripts. Scripts for audio, multimedia presentations, and motion picture and television productions are written. May be offered under a different topic area such as: COMM 303 Scriptwriting: Comedy or COMM 303 Scriptwriting: Drama. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits under a different topic area. Students who need to D/F repeat COMM 303 may repeat the course under a different variable title.
  
  • COMM 306 - 2-D Digital Game Development


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 206 
    Examines the theory and development of digital games. Topics explored include the logics of gameplay, the process of game development, gaming technology, and the psychology of gaming. The history and organization of the gaming industry are also examined. Students also create deliverables around a game concept they develop in the process of completing the course.
  
  • COMM 315 - Persuasive Media Writing


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 ; ENGL 101  and ENGL 202  (grades of “C” or better)
    Introduces concepts of writing persuasive announcements, such as commercials and promotional messages, and other content for digital media. Analyzes persuasive media announcements, and incorporates writing with the use of evidence, emotion, and reasoning to reach audiences. Aids in understanding how to create media messages that influence audience attitudes and behaviors.
  
  • COMM 325 - Gender in Media


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An overview of women in media (including television, film, radio, the Internet, etc.) and the historical development, along with social context that influence women’s involvement in the media, both nationally and internationally. Analyzes topics related to media effect theories and portrayal of women in media that influence some of the issues women face in their gender roles. Also identifies key women in media from the past and present and their contributions to the field.
  
  • COMM 335 - Communications Consulting and Project Management


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 
    Presents the theoretical views and clinical applications of consulting skills and practices associated with and needed by communication professionals. Presented are the functions and role of the consultant, the client’s perspective on consulting, hiring a consultant, ethics in consulting, personal assessment tests, and related literature and models.
  
  • COMM 340 - Advanced Communication Graphics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 240 , permission
    An in-depth experience in planning and preparing graphic materials commonly used in the communications profession; graphic materials include design, photosketching, lettering, slide titling and duplication, preparation of camera-ready art, lithographic film and master layout sheets, professional slide flat production and photocopy, large-format transparency production, color key, and color systems.
  
  • COMM 345 - Television Criticism


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 150  or instructor permission
    The medium of television offers a unique environment for development and delivery of information, entertainment, and news. Explores and analyzes television programming. Includes examination of genres ranging from situation comedy to drama to miniseries and made-for-TV movies.
  
  • COMM 348 - Animation


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 150 
    Introduces traditional and digital animation techniques and offers practical experience in planning and producing animated sequences. Includes a history of animation and theories of animation, both applied and as a communication medium. Practice in designing, drawing, modeling, simulating, creating, and texturing animated sequences; preparation of character designs; story boards and cue sheets; integration of visual effects, animation, and sound.
  
  • COMM 349 - Radio Production


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 ; communications media major or minor, audio production certificate enrollment or permission
    An introduction to production techniques as they pertain to radio. Exposure to programming, scripting, producing programs, intros, outros, commercials, public service announcements, station identifications, and promotional announcements. Also deals with the interaction of a radio station with national networks and with the real-life concerns of deadlines.
  
  • COMM 350 - Digital Storytelling


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 249  or COMM 251  or COMM 349 ; cannot be taken concurrently; communications media major or communications media minor or audio certificate status
    Introduces the process of documentary style storytelling through digital media, including podcasting and vlogging. Evaluates the history of these digital platforms and how they are used to tell stories. This production course affords opportunities to produce story content to enhance storytelling abilities within a given media format.
  
  • COMM 351 - Advanced Video Production


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 251 
    A production course that emphasizes advanced field production techniques. Some of the topics covered include; field lighting, video post-production editing with A-B roll, on-line editing, and non-linear editing. Provides hands-on experience through projects and field trips. May be offered under a different topic area such as: COMM 351 Advanced Video Production: Documentary Video or COMM 351 Advanced Video Production: Music Videos. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits under a different topic area. Students who need to D/F repeat COMM 351 may repeat the course under a different variable title.
  
  • COMM 354 - Media Law and Policy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 150  or instructor permission
    Surveys areas of law and policy regulating commercial and consumer use of media technologies. Covers law and policy pertaining to broadcasting and cable, intellectual property, station licensing and renewal, defamation, privacy, Internet regulation. Examines the historical development of the FCC and its jurisdictions. Discusses case studies along with the relevancy of some laws as they pertain to today’s mediated society. (Titled Broadcast Regulation before 2015-16.)
  
  • COMM 355 - Editing for Video and Film


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 251  
    Explores the art of video and film post-production and editing techniques utilizing editing software. Reviews editing theory to edit audio, video, film, and graphic footages. Covers advanced topics such as adding visual (VFX) and sound (SFX) effects.
  
  • COMM 360 - Digital Sports Production


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Instructor permission
    An introduction to the pre-production, production, and post-production processes of live and recorded sporting events. Engagement in all aspects of the production process, including live production for webcasting, video-recording and editing sporting events. Attendance and participation is required in the production of selected local sporting events, which may include nights and weekends outside of regular class time. This course may be repeated one time for a maximum of six credits.
  
  • COMM 371 - Advanced Photography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 271 , permission
    Develops camera and print-making skills to the degree that salon-quality photographic prints can be produced. Students will understand the photographic processes utilized in producing a high-quality negative and print to the extent that they can manipulate those processes to communicate an intended message with their photographs. Emphasizes camera and print control as well as composition and negative and print manipulation.
  
  • COMM 374 - Documentary Photography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing, COMM 101  or JRNL 105 , or permission
    Prepares students to photograph documentary content that explores aspects of historical significance, cultural value, social change, and social injustice. Explores the differences and similarities between documentary photography and purely aesthetic photography to capture images focused on social and historical value. Calls for students to critically analyze documentary images, projects, photographers, and the societal impact they have made to create new and influential images for modern and future utilization. Students are required to have access to a digital camera.
  
  • COMM 375 - Mass Media and Behavior


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSYC 101  and junior or senior status
    Theory and research on the influence of the mass media on human behavior and attitudes. Topics include the effects of news and political advertising on public opinion; the effects of racist and sexist portrayals; and the effects of violence and pornography on aggressive behavior. (Also offered as PSYC 375; may be taken only once.)
  
  • COMM 380 - The History of African Americans in Film


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Traces the historical development of the roles of African Americans in film. Examines the early stereotypic portrayals of this group, the origins of these stereotypes, and the ongoing changes, positive and negative, that have occurred regarding the media representation through research, film, and archetypal analysis, observation, and discussion. The new generation of African American filmmakers and their creative efforts to promote more realistic portrayals are analyzed.
  
  • COMM 390 - Practicum in Communications


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Communications media major, department permission
    A specialized study under the supervision of a faculty sponsor. Students make media service contributions to department and campus media-related facilities, while receiving credit. For each practicum credit, students will log a minimum of 90 hours of service. A maximum of 6 practicum credits can be used within a 120-credit degree program. The combination of practicum and internship credits cannot exceed 15 credits.
  
  • COMM 395 - Career Planning in Communications Media


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Communications media major only with junior/senior status
    Serves as the primary skill-building and strategy-seeking experience for the internship program and later career entry and growth. Extensive writing, research, and individual counseling are involved.
  
  • COMM 400 - Professional Preparation


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Major in Communications Media; Junior or Senior Standing
    Explores short- and long-term career goals for entering the professional world, creating materials for self-marketing and managing the transition from college to internship to the workplace in fields related but not limited to broadcasting, media production, media marketing, and media relations.
  
  • COMM 401 - Media Programming and Promotion


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the process and practice of promoting media outlets and the content on those outlets. Engages in an understanding of the purpose and methods of developing, launching, scheduling, and evaluating programming on traditional and newer media platforms. Using those concepts, aids in an understanding of promoting that media content by providing instruction in developing, writing and executing promotional concepts to gain audiences for specific media outlets.
  
  • COMM 403 - Multimedia News Writing


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COMM 101  or JRNL 105 ; ENGL 101  and ENGL 202  (grades of “C” or better) or permission
    Introduces students to various styles and script formats used in writing news scripts for multiple media platforms including radio, television and online content. Analyzes newsrelated theories and the legal and ethical responsibilities of news writers and producers. Focuses on writing skills for different platforms.
 

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