Jun 14, 2024  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Credit designation at right of title is expressed in (c) class hours per week, (l) lab or (d) discussion section hours per week, and (cr) number of credits per semester.

 

Asian Studies

  
  • ASIA 200 - Introduction to Asian Studies


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces the study of Asian societies. Examines different regions of Asia and also different academic disciplines and how they create knowledge about Asia.
  
  • ASIA 483 - Honors Thesis


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Asian Studies minor, 3.25 cumulative GPA; 3.5 GPA in Asian Studies courses, departmental permission. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.
    A two-semester sequence of research and writing, culminating in an honors thesis or project. Honors theses are completed individually under the direc­tion of a professor who specializes in the student’s area of interest and are approved by a thesis committee comprising the thesis director and two others. Repeatable: May be taken twice for a total of 6cr.

Business Communication

  
  • BCOM 321 - Business and Interpersonal Communications


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 101 , ENGL 202 
    A study of communication theory and principles as applied to business situations and practices; development of communication skills in areas of communication such as speaking, writing, listening, and nonverbal commu­nicating. Emphasizes building effective interpersonal relations in a business environment. (Offered as BTST 321 before 2014-15.)
  
  • BCOM 342 - Intercultural Business Communication


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing
    An in-depth study and theoretical understanding of intercultural busi­ness communication, including international, national, ethic, racial, and socioeconomic cultures. Explore practices, trends, and difficulties of people primarily identified with one culture attempting to interact with people of another culture through speaking, listening, writing, and nonverbal means. Problems of intercultural communication situations for business are pinpointed, elements of the problems clarified, and guidelines projected for problem mitigation. (Offered as BTST 342 before 2014-15.)

Biochemistry

  
  • BIOC 290 - Biochemistry Seminar I


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Biochemistry major or instructor permission
    Provides undergraduate research and career possibilities based on a degree in biochemistry or chemistry. Includes presentations by research faculty in biochemistry, chemistry and departments across the university.
  
  • BIOC 301 - Foundations of Biochemistry


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 202  and a grade of “C” or better in CHEM 332 
    A foundation in biochemical principles emphasizing the structure/function relationships of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids. Catalysis by enzymes, including reaction mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation of activity are considered in detail. The structure of biological membranes and transport of both solutes and signals across membranes are explored. As­sumes an understanding of eukaryotic cell structure and organic chemistry of major functional groups.
  
  • BIOC 311 - Biochemistry Laboratory I


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEM 351  or BIOC 301  

    Presents an overview of the theoretical understanding and practical, hands-on learning of biochemical laboratory techniques, focusing on protein purification and characterization. Introduces common techniques that are currently used in biochemistry research.
  
  • BIOC 401 - Laboratory Methods in Biology and Biotechnology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 4
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 351  or BIOC 301 
    Theory and practice in a number of major analytical and preparative tech­niques currently in use in physiology, molecular biology, and biotechnol­ogy. (Also offered as BIOL 401 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • BIOC 402 - Advanced Biochemistry


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOC 301 
    Examination of biochemical processes with a focus on metabolism. Central pathways considered in detail, including regulatory mechanisms and hormonal signaling. Other selected processes and integration of mammalian metabolism are explored. Assumes an understanding of concepts relating to structure/function relationships for biomolecules, biological membranes, and signaling included in BIOC 301 .
  
  • BIOC 412 - Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory II


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOC 311  
    Presents an overview of the theoretical understanding and practical, hands-on learning of computational biochemistry and bioengineering laboratory techniques, focusing on protein structure-function studies, engineering and characterization. Introduces advanced biochemical techniques that are currently used in biochemistry  research.
  
  • BIOC 480 - Biochemistry Seminar II


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: BIOC 301  or CHEM 351 

     
    Discusses the current trends in biochemical thought along with biomedical and scientific ethics. Includes skills for critical reading of different forms of scientific literature and communications along with the important elements of different types of scientific writing such as research proposals, and communications required in a biochemical or biomedical work environment.

  
  • BIOC 481 - Special Topics in Biochemistry


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: BIOC 402  or CHEM 351 
    A lecture-discussion course of recent biochemical topics or those of unique interest. Topic and instructors to change annually.
  
  • BIOC 482 - Independent Research in Biochemistry


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: BIOC 402 , BIOC 412 , permission by program coordinator
    Student conducts a research project in any area of biochemistry. Work su­pervised by faculty. Does not involve regular class or lab hours. Enrollment by permission only.
  
  • BIOC 490 - Biochemistry Senior Seminar


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: BIOC 480  
    A discussion of recent trends in biochemical thought. Oral and written reports on assigned readings, and library or laboratory research. Guest lecturers. The combination BIOC 480-490 counts as one writing-intensive course. (Also offered as CHEM 490 . These courses may be substituted for each other and be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.)

    .


Biology

  
  • BIOL 101 - Basic Biology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Deals with the principles of biology. Topics include cellular structure and physiology, growth and repair, reproduction and development, control, sources of food energy, inheritance, and man’s interrelationship with his biological environment. The classification of plants and animals is reviewed briefly. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory.
  
  • BIOL 103 - Life on Earth


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 4

    Introduces ecology, conservation, and evolutionary biology, emphasizing how ecological change caused by human activities impacts plant and animal populations, communities, and ecosystems and how living things interact with each other and the physical environment.  Applies scientific method to learn fundamental concepts and explore problems in ecology and conservation.  
  
  • BIOL 104 - Human Biology: How the Human Body Works


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 4

    Introduces functions of the human body using disease as a mechanism. Explores the internal milieu of the body and how the different body systems affect this balance. Gain an appreciation for the human body and its interactions with the environment.
  
  • BIOL 105 - Cell Biology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces concepts and applications for understanding human biological function from the point of view of cellular biology.
  
  • BIOL 106 - Human Genetics and Health


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Demonstrates how genetics and molecular biology contribute to human health with emphasis on inherited diseases, genetic therapies, and individualized medicine. Introduces the therapeutic uses of stem cells, the genetics of cancer, and the utilization of vaccines in the treatment and prevention of human disease.
  
  • BIOL 107 - Introduction to Forensic Biology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Overviews the basic principles underlying modern applications of biology in forensic science. Explores the science of forensic biology, traditionally known as serology, and the broad scope of laboratory tests used to investigate crimes involving DNA, blood, and other body fluids. Focuses on the issues related to DNA fingerprinting as they apply to public or legal proceedings in the law enforcement arena.
  
  • BIOL 115 - Biotic Diversity of North America


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces students to the plants, animals, interactions, and functions of major North American aquatic and terrestrial biomes, and explores the impact of changes in climate, biodiversity, energy demands, and human population growth on these ecosystems.
  
  • BIOL 116 - Human Genetics and Health Laboratory


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 1

    Demonstrates our broad reliance on genetics through application of molecular and genetic tools to investigate aspects of disease, inheritance, microbial/viral infection, and antibiotic resistance.
  
  • BIOL 117 - Understanding HIV Biology and AIDS


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces the mode of infection and prevention of AIDS virus which are used as an illustration of biological principles. Profiles biological indicators for HIV disease and its progression to AIDS. Emphasizes therapeutic and non-therapeutic approaches to treat HIV infections.
  
  • BIOL 118 - The History of Pain


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Describes the anatomical and physiological foundation of pain based on contemporary science. Examines the history of scientific theories and hypotheses about understanding the pain mechanism. Introduces students to the status of pain in various societies throughout the ages.
  
  • BIOL 119 - Emerging Diseases


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Provides an understanding of the biological basis of infectious diseases and the social, historical and ethical consequences of these types of afflictions. Covers background material such as the germ theory of disease and the cell theory at an introductory level. Includes specific cases of emerging or reemerging infectious diseases with emphasis on current events relating to disease outbreaks.
  
  • BIOL 123 - Perspectives in Cell and Molecular Biology


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    For those interested in entering the Cell and Molecular Biology Track. Introduces the latest advances in the fields of molecular biology and biotechnology, as well as the career possibilities and professional responsibilities in these fields. Aids students in clarifying career goals and introduces them to the literature of molecular biology, including electronic resources. Includes field trips that might take place on weekends.
  
  • BIOL 150 - Human Anatomy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    A study of the functional and systematic anatomy of humans. Laboratory studies focus on models of human organs and systems along with a dissected human cadaver. Also includes mammals whose anatomy is then related to the human condition.
  
  • BIOL 155 - Human Physiology and Anatomy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Non-Biology Department majors only (nutrition, dietetics, family and consumer sciences education, health and physical education, and safety, health, and environmental applied sciences majors)
    A study of structure and function of the human body. Emphasizes normal function, with particular attention to functional anatomy, control mechanisms, and interrelationships among systems. Laboratory studies include experimentation and dissection. For students with little or no science background.
  
  • BIOL 200 - Medical Terminology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Requires students to not only learn vocabulary, but also the proper pronunciation of medical terms. A class limit is requested to accommodate pedagogical approaches to developing oral pronunciation skills.
  
  • BIOL 201 - Principles of Ecology and Evolution


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: For science majors only
    An introduction to ecology, including physiological and behavioral ecology, population and community ecology, and ecosystem and landscape ecology, and to evolution, including natural selection and population genetics, speciation, and phylogenetic history and systematics of life. Develops skills in the use of the scientific method. For science majors.
  
  • BIOL 202 - Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    An introduction to the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their cellular biochemistry, with emphasis on the genetic flow of information from DNA to RNA to protein and the regulatory events, including cell-cell communication, that instruct these pathways. Develops skills in the use of the scientific method. For science majors. (Offered as BIOL 111 before 2015-16.)
  
  • BIOL 203 - Principles of Genetics and Development


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: BIOL 202  
    Introduces the science of genetics, with an emphasis on the basic principles of Mendelian genetics, the genetics of populations, molecular genetics, and the genetics of development. For science majors. (Offered as BIOL 263 before 2015-16.)
  
  • BIOL 205 - Ecological Methods


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201 ; MATH 216  or MATH 217 
    Introduces the standard approaches for hypothesis testing in biological research, including experimental design, data collection, and data analysis. Emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of ecological data sets. Computer instruction focuses on software programs commonly used for biological data analysis.
  
  • BIOL 210 - Plant Biology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201  
    Explores the diversity, form, and function of vascular and nonvascular plants. Focuses on the evolutionary innovations that distinguish different taxonomic groups of plants. Topics  include plant anatomy and physiology, growth and development, plant classification, plant ecology, and genetically modified foods. Discusses ways that plants are important  to humans, ranging from food and lumber to sequestering carbon dioxide. An in-depth  exploration of crop plants, including the science of biotechnology. 
  
  • BIOL 211 - Investigative Biological Forensics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 107  or equivalent
    The lecture-only course examines how to collect and analyze biological evidences found on clothing, bones, insects, plants, weapons, and other surfaces to help identify victims and support criminal investigations. Covers a variety of subjects intimately linked including forensic anatomy, odontology, anthropology, pathology, entomology, botany, and environmental contamination. Presents case studies for each set of biological materials like insects, plants, bones, and fluids. Features in-depth discussion and writing.
  
  • BIOL 220 - General Zoology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201  
    Examines the evolution, form, and function of all major animal phyla, from sponges through chordates. Interactive lecture-laboratory sessions follow a phylogenetic approach to the animal kingdom and incorporate essentials of animal ecology, physiology, functional morphology, and behavior.
  
  • BIOL 221 - Environmental Health and Protection


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: 4cr BIOL lab course and 4cr CHEM lab course 
    Surveys indoor and outdoor environmental health hazards. Hazards are addressed from the standpoint of their source and nature, human health effects, measurement and control, and management.
  
  • BIOL 240 - Human Physiology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: BIOL 150  or BIOL 203  or KHSS 221  
    The study of the mechanisms, but with the human organism functions. Mechanisms covered range from the molecular/subcellular to the tissue, organ, and organism levels. Organ systems examined include the nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, renal, digestive, and reproductive. Emphasizes three major themes: (1) that organ functions are dependent on the underlying molecular and cellular processes, (2) that all organ systems use biological control systems to maintain organ homeostasis, and (3) that each organ function is closely controlled and dependent on the interaction/integration with functions from other organ systems. (Offered as BIOL 151 before 2015-16.)
  
  • BIOL 241 - Introductory Medical Microbiology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  or BIOL 240  
    An introduction to medical microbiology that focuses on the structure, biology, and genetics of microbes in relation to human disease and to bacteriology as well as bacterial, viral, fungal pathogens and the mechanisms of disease. Prepares student for advance study in microbiology and the health sciences. Standard methods and techniques are emphasized in laboratory.
  
  • BIOL 250 - Principles of Microbiology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or BIOL 203  or instructor permission
    An introduction to microbiology focusing on the fundamental principles of microbial structure, modes of reproduction, genetics, and physiology. Emphasizes the importance of microbes in ecological, industrial, immunological, and epidemiological processes. Standard microbiological methods and techniques are emphasized in laboratory.
  
  • BIOL 261 - Ornithology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    A study of birds of the region. Indoor laboratory as well as early-morning and possibly weekend field trips required.
  
  • BIOL 272 - Conservation of Plant and Animal Resources


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201 -BIOL 202  or BIOL 103 -BIOL 104 
    A study of accepted practices in soil, water, forest, and wildlife conservation. Saturday field trips included.
  
  • BIOL 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • BIOL 300 - Genetics in Medicine and Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  or BIOL 241  
    Examines how our genes play a role in disease and diet. Includes a fundamental background of genetics, as well as specific diseases that are caused by defective genes. Explores how nutrition interacts with the genome and its impact on health and disease.
  
  • BIOL 301 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MATH 216  or MATH 217  
    Introduces epidemiologic principles, concepts, and methods used to study the distribution and determinants of diseases in populations. Includes public health and clinical applications. Covers the history of epidemiology, dynamics of disease transmission, measures of disease frequency and association, study designs, causation, and also considers ethics and public policy issues in epidemiology. (Offered as BIOL 460 before 2016-17.)
  
  • BIOL 310 - Applied Entomology and Zoonoses


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201 , BIOL 220  
    A study of the measures for abatement or control of arthropods, rodents, birds, and other disease vectors of public importance; selection, chemistry, formulation, and safe application of insecticides, rodenticides, and fumigants; pesticiding equipment; application of biological and other measures of control.
  
  • BIOL 313 - Forensic Analysis of DNA


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  or BIOL 211  
    The lecture-only course introduces the identification and assessment of biological evidence in criminal matters using DNA. Presents routinely used broad-based protocols for DNA typing, sample collection, and techniques applied in quality assurance during DNA profiling. Covers important questions about the use of DNA by criminal justice system.
  
  • BIOL 323 - Introduction to Toxicology and Risk Assessment


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 104  or BIOL 203 ; CHEM 101   or CHEM 111  or CHEM 113 CHEM 102  or CHEM 112  or CHEM 114  
    A study of uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of environmental chemicals; mechanisms of their toxicity; and their effects on major organ systems. Knowledge of these topics is applied to risk assessment procedures.
  
  • BIOL 331 - Developmental Biology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  
    Studies cellular, molecular, and genetic control of embryonic and post-embryonic development. Introduces the principles of cell differentiation, stem cell behavior, and how cell fate decisions are coupled to the morphogenesis of tissues/organs. Emphasizes how the loss of developmental signaling pathways lead to the onset of human disease.
  
  • BIOL 342 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201  
    An investigation of the comparative structure and function of the vertebrate body emphasizing the diverse solutions to the problem of design for survival and the evolutionary mechanisms that provide those solutions. Meets twice per week for 2.5 hours. Each meeting includes both lecture and laboratory experiences.
  
  • BIOL 352 - Comparative Animal Physiology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or BIOL 202 , CHEM 231 
    A comparative study of homeostatic mechanisms and systems in animals and their relation to fundamental chemical and physical events in cells.
  
  • BIOL 362 - Ecology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201  
    Studies the interrelations and adaptations of organisms; includes consideration of physical and biotic environmental factors. Field trips.
  
  • BIOL 364 - Immunology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 241  
    Studies the principles, cellular and molecular interactions of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Emphasizes the relationship between basic immunology and clinical immunologic diseases. Applies major modern techniques used in immunology.
  
  • BIOL 401 - Laboratory Methods in Biology and Biotechnology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 4
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 351  or BIOC 301 
    Theory and practice in a number of major analytical and preparative techniques currently in use in physiology, molecular biology, and biotechnology. (Also offered as BIOC 401 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • BIOL 402 - Advanced Human Anatomy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: BIOL 202 ; not open to students who have successfully completed BIOL 150 ; not open to students who have completed fewer than 60cr.
    An intensive study of the gross anatomical structures and their functions within the human body. Explores the organization and integration of the human body on a region-by-region basis. For each region of the body, students observe all structures within that region simultaneously. This approach allows students to appreciate the integration of different biological systems within the body. Laboratory sessions center on regional cadaver dissection by groups of students to appreciate 3-D anatomical relationships.
  
  • BIOL 405 - The Biology of the Cell - Critical Thinking


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203 CHEM 231  
    Introduces the cellular and modular mechanism by which individual cells grow, receive, and respond to internal and external signals and move. Discusses the latest advances in the discipline; students are expected to use current literature on their own as a means of building critical-thinking skills. Emphasizes individual and group activities.
  
  • BIOL 409 - Pharmacology Principles and Applications


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 106  or BIOL 202  or BIOL 240 
    Explores the principles of the interactions of chemicals with biological systems in the context of human diseases of varied etiology (e.g. genetic, environmental) and clinical presentation. Introduces the general principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, integrating analysis at multiple biological levels (molecular, cellular, systems, organismal) to develop a broad view of the interaction of drugs with biological systems. Develops skills in pharmacological analysis through examination of actual and simulated sets of data. Examines applications of principles to specific fields of pharmacology (e.g., neuro-, cardiovascular, immuno-, endocrine, cancer) and explores the discovery and development of new medications using examples from recent scientific and clinical trial literature.
  
  • BIOL 410 - Molecular Biology Topics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  or 263 or BIOC 301  or CHEM 351 
    Involves the study of biological phenomena in molecular terms. Focuses on recombinant DNA principles as they relate to prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Emphasizes the modern methods used in recombinant DNA technology.
  
  • BIOL 411 - Forensic Biology Laboratory Operations


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  or BIOL 313  
    A broad-based learning experience in multiple areas of Biological Forensics with special emphasis in unique nucleic acid and protein signature(s) patterns associated with the forensic biological evidence. Applies the theory and practice of presumptive and confirmatory testing methods on materials of forensic interest. Features in-depth discussion that integrates advanced characterization of biological evidences as it relates to criminal investigation and interpretation of the criminal justice system.
  
  • BIOL 420 - Entomology Principles and Practice


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 103  or BIOL 201  
    Introduces the biology of insects, including identification and classification.
    Enables collecting of live insects from different habitats and observation of
    behavior and ecological roles during outdoor laboratory activities. Emphasizes characteristics unique to insects, such as pollination, metamorphosis, sociality, host plant specificity, and population control.
  
  • BIOL 425 - Herpetology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 103  or BIOL 201 
    Introduces the scientific study of amphibians, reptiles, turtles, and crocodilians, including the taxonomy, phylogenetic relationships, evolutionary history and fossil record, structure and development, natural history, and conservation of each group. Provides field-based exercises and/or field trips as part of the laboratory, which may also include specimen examination and identification, guest speakers, and discussions of both classic and recent scientific literature in herpetology.
  
  • BIOL 430 - Gene Editing Tools in Medicine and Biotechnology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  
    Explains concepts and techniques involved in modern biotechnology as it relates to genome engineering. Understands the principles and techniques governing the gene editing tools such as CRISPR in microbiology, agriculture, animal sciences, and human health. Emphasizes acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to undertake gene editing using CRISPR. Addresses issues concerning their ethical, legal, and social implications in the United States and the world.
  
  • BIOL 431 - Ichthyology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 103  or BIOL 201  and Sophomore status
    Introduces the biology, taxonomy, natural history, and conservation of freshwater and marine fishes. Examines the morphological and physiological adaptations that have allowed fish, the most diverse group of vertebrates, to thrive across a wide array of environments throughout the globe. Lab emphasizes field collection and identification of fish found in Pennsylvania and the Great Lakes region, but select representatives from other families are also covered. Critically evaluates published scientific papers related to fish biology, physiology, and evolution.
  
  • BIOL 450 - Field Biology at Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    During the summer session, various field courses are offered through the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology. The offerings vary, depending on the summer. Possible offerings include Field Methods in Ecology and Conservation, Fish Ecology, Behavioral Ecology, Aquatic Botany, Forest Ecology, and Wildlife Conservation. Information regarding specific offerings is available from the department in the spring.
  
  • BIOL 451 - Evolutionary Biology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201 , BIOL 203 
    A comprehensive survey of evolution and evolutionary biology, including the history of evolutionary theory, natural selection, microevolutionary and macroevolutionary processes, and the phylogenetic history and classification of life on earth. In laboratory, the focus is on learning current methods in population-level and phylogenetic analysis and presenting and leading peer discussions of important and current research in the field.
  
  • BIOL 455 - Animal Behavior


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Not open to students who have fewer than 60 credits
    Offers a comparative and integrative overview of how and why animals as diverse as insects and humans behave the way that they do, linking behaviors to the brain, genes, and hormones, as well as to the surrounding ecological and social environments. Demonstrates how researchers use scientific logic to study the underlying mechanisms and evolutionary bases of behavior, with emphasis on how evolutionary theory unifies the various subdisciplines within animal behavior.
  
  • BIOL 456 - Ecological Toxicology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 202 CHEM 112  
    Studies the impact of chemical pollutants and other stresses on nonhuman biological systems from the subcellular to ecosystem levels. An ecological risk assessment is conducted in the field and laboratory settings.
  
  • BIOL 462 - Vertebrate Endocrinology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  or CHEM 351  
    Examines how hormones, or cell signaling molecules, are produced in specific endocrine tissues and alter the physiology of the of respective target tissues.
  
  • BIOL 466 - Principles of Virology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 203  or CHEM 351  
    Topics include structure, classification, assay, and transmission of viruses; methods used in the study of viruses; viral replication, gene expression, and gene regulation; host-viral interactions and subviral pathogens.
  
  • BIOL 469 - Circadian Rhythms and Sleep


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 104  or BIOL 203  or BIOL 240  
    Introduces the functions and mechanisms of biological clocks and rhythms in humans and animals, focusing primarily on circadian, or daily, rhythms. Examines how biological clocks keep time and influence behavior and physiology from the molecular level. Explains how circadian rhythms control sleep-wake and other important neurological functions to optimize biological fitness. Explores the consequences of disrupted circadian timing on physical and psychological health and performance.
  
  • BIOL 471 - Dendrology of the Eastern US


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    A comprehensive survey of the tree species in the eastern portion of North America with an emphasis on Pennsylvania forests.
  
  • BIOL 473 - Seedless Vascular Plants: Ferns and Allied Flora


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    A comprehensive survey of morphological and habitat characteristics of seedless vascular plants (generally ferns and their allies) of Pennsylvania and the surrounding states.
  
  • BIOL 474 - Spring Flora of the North Eastern US


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    An in-depth survey of the emerging herbaceous spring flora in the northeastern portion of North America (with emphasis on the herbaceous plants of Pennsylvania). Classes will focus on readings of current research in botanical and scientific journals conveyed through student led discussions. Field identification of representative individuals by common and generic names is also covered.
  
  • BIOL 475 - Mammalogy


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201   and a minimum of 30 credits
    Reviews mammalian biology including systematics, evolution, distribution, anatomical and physiological adaptations, behaviors, habitats, and ecology. Discusses mammalian biology using taxonomic orders from around the world. Focuses on identification, natural history, and methods of study for mammals native to Pennsylvania. Participation in off-campus field activities required.
  
  • BIOL 476 - Parasitology


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 202  
    Studies parasitic protozoa, flatworms and roundworms. Emphasizes species parasitizing humans and includes their classification, structure, biochemistry, physiology, molecular biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and epidemiology.
  
  • BIOL 477 - Neurobiology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 202  or BIOL 240  or any 300-level PSYC course
    Presents the underlying mechanisms through which the nervous system mediates behavior, from the molecular to the organismal level. Emphasizes two major themes: (1) the roles of synapses and neuronal excitability in shaping the input/output functions of neurons and neuronal networks and (2) the role of neuronal development and neuronal experience upon resultant neuronal organization.
  
  • BIOL 478 - Mycology and Plant Pathology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 201 BIOL 241  
    Introduces fungi as one of the most important plant pathogens. Provides a basis for comparative study of different groups of fungi. Studies basic biotic and abiotic causes of plant disease, the mechanisms by which these factors induce disease, the interactions between disease agents and their hosts, disease spread, prevention, and management, and the human and environmental costs of plant diseases.
  
  • BIOL 479 - Neurobiology of Addiction


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 104  or BIOL 203  or BIOL 240  
    Examines the biological foundations of addiction, with special emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms. Studies: (1) the effects of a wide range of drugs of abuse on brain function, (2) the neural circuitry of addiction, (3) the neurobiological influence of genes and environment on drug taking, and (4) the biological basis for traits linked to drug use, such as personality, memory, and mood. Discusses how cutting-edge biological methods are answering key questions about addiction and how the results of such research can be used to improve clinical treatment.
  
  • BIOL 480 - Biology Seminar


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Discusses recent trends and issues in science, and examines differing viewpoints and current research.
  
  • BIOL 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Course varies from semester to semester, covering diverse topics in specific areas of biology.
  
  • BIOL 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost. A 2.5 cumulative GPA and in major courses is required.
    Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member. Work is supervised by a faculty member, but does not involve regular class or laboratory hours. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.
  
  • BIOL 483 - Honors Thesis/Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite: Admission to departmental honors program; prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    An intensive, focused study involving independent research culminating in a written thesis approved by a thesis director and two faculty readers/committee members. Repeatable: May be taken more than once to a maximum of 6cr.
  
  • BIOL 484 - Honors Seminar


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Biology Honors Program
    Selected topics in biology. Use of the literature in preparation for advanced course work and BIOL 483 . Analyzes the literature, develops a literature review, and develops a thesis proposal. Guest speakers provide additional exposure to major areas of biology.
  
  • BIOL 490 - Field Studies in Biology


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-4

    Prerequisite: Specific Prerequisites, as are appropriate to the course, will be set by individual instructors; instructor permission
    Various specialized field courses instructed by biologists from IUP. Explores the rich diversity and ecology of the flora and fauna that inhabit specialized regions of Pennsylvania, the United States, or other countries. Emphasizes ecology, behavior, and natural history of organisms in their natural surroundings. Must meet travel and living expenses. Repeatable: May be taken more than once for credit and grade if content is different.
  
  • BIOL 493 - Biology Internship


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3-12

    Prerequisite: Biology major with at least 60cr, 2.5 cumulative GPA, and permission of the director of internships and the chairperson
    Selected students have the opportunity, under department supervision, to gain off-campus practical experience in area of interest. Only 6cr may be applied toward major; total number of credits is decided in consultation involving student, his/her advisor, and director of internships.

Business Law

  
  • BLAW 235 - Legal Environment of Business


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the current American legal system by providing an introduction to a variety of legal topics important to all individuals and businesses. Topics must include sources of law, the court system and basic procedures, tort law, criminal law, and contracts. Topics may also include legal research and intellectual property. Ethical issues and international law are integrated throughout.
  
  • BLAW 336 - Law of Business Organizations


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BLAW 235 
    A study of the law dealing with commercial paper, agency, partnerships, corporations, and bankruptcy.
  
  • BLAW 440 - Business Negotiations


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BLAW 235 , Jr Business Core, and Junior Standing
    Covers the basic theories and strategies of negotiation in the business environment and provides instruction and practice to develop Negotiation skills. Focuses on the knowledge and skills needed in intercompany and intracompany negotiations. Focuses on neither collective bargaining nor labor relations. Open to all majors meeting the prerequisites.
  
  • BLAW 441 - The Law of Property Oil and Gas Leasing I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BLAW 235 
    Gives students an understanding of fundamental energy law, including oil and gas law. Includes analysis of natural resource leases and contracts, rights and ownership of the mineral estate, law of capture, contracts, clauses, and covenants of the oil and gas lease, oil and gas operating agreements, title and conveyance of oil and gas leases, pooling and utilization on private and federal lands, easements and right of ways in connection with natural resource exploration, environmental considerations and impacts of natural resource drilling and exploration, the legal structure of the energy industry, (Public Utility Holding Company Act, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) land use restrictions, and eminent domain.
  
  • BLAW 442 - The Law of Property Oil and Gas Leasing II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BLAW 441 
    Second legal course in the energy/oil and gas sequence and builds upon and advances concepts from the first course. Specifically geared toward the sophisticated legal understanding required to be employed as “landman” in the oil and gas fields. Covers these topics: the Habendum Clause, the drilling and rental clause, dry hole, cessation of production, and drilling operation provisions, delayed rental and bonus provisions, forfeiture and related provisions, implied covenants, prudent operator standard, implied drilling covenants, protection covenants, development, marketing and reasonable care covenants, assignments of royalties, royalty calculation under various state laws, drilling, and operating agreements, assignment of working interest, pooling and utilization issues and problems, oil and gas forms and leases, lien subrogation rights, environmental impacts from drilling standpoint and landowner standpoint. Industry guest speakers may also address these issues.

Business and Technology Education

  
  • BTED 101 - Computer Literacy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An introductory course designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of computers.  Familiarizes students with the interaction of computer hardware and software.  An emphasis is placed on the application of microcomputers, the use of productivity software (word processing, spreadsheet management, file and database management), and the social and ethical aspects of the impact of computers on society.  Note:  Cross-listed as COSC 101  and IFMG 101 .  Any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D or F repeats, but may not be counted for duplicate credit. (Offered as  BEDU 101 prior to 2001-02) 
  
  • BTED 411 - Methods in Business and Information Technology I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EDSP 102 , PSYC 101 , and completion of the freshman and sophomore courses in the student’s major areas
    Includes instruction in the general methods of teaching and evaluating business courses. A major emphasis is on the planning for instruction. Creative techniques and procedures for effectively teaching and managing the classroom are evaluated. Opportunities are provided to incorporate appropriate content and materials to allow for students with special learning needs. Current issues in vocational education such as advisory committees, adult education, and federal legislation are included.
  
  • BTED 412 - Methods in Business and Information Technology II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BTED 411 
    Includes instruction in the methods of teaching and evaluating both the technology-oriented and cognitive-related courses in business education. An emphasis is placed on planning instruction, developing methods and strategies for making effective classroom presentations, delivering instruction, and managing the classroom. Opportunities are provided to undertake the responsibilities assigned to the business classroom teacher incorporating appropriate content and materials to allow for students with special learning needs. Further, the prospective teacher is given opportunities to assume the teaching role competencies and research current trends in the field.
  
  • BTED 442 - Training Methods in Business and Information Technology Support


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSYC 101 , junior standing
    Includes the application of theories of adult learning to planning, delivering, and evaluating training for education and information technology. Major emphasis is on the planning of instruction. Topics include needs assessment, live and mediated instruction, classroom management, evaluation and follow-up methods, and evaluation of training strategies. (Offered as BTST 442 before 2014-15.)
  
  • BTED 470 - Technology Applications for Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Provides a prospective business educator with concepts, applications, and methodologies needed to be effective in today’s classroom, including advanced web page coding, advanced computer applications, creation of an inquiry-oriented activity in which the information that learners interact with comes from Internet resources, and a learned society’s rules for records management. Also includes instruction in the pedagogy of computer applications. The end product will be additions to students’ e-portfolios as well as their work sample.

Child Development and Family Relations

  
  • CDFR 218 - Child Development


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in PSYC 101 ; or instructor permission  
    Corequisite: SOC 151  /SOC 161  
    Reviews cultural practices within and across global communities, developmental theories, learning theories, as well as the interrelationships among culture, development, and learning. Focuses on physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development from conception to adolescence.
  
  • CDFR 224 - Marriage and Family Relations


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C”  or better in PSYC 101 ; or instructor permission  
    Corequisite: SOC 151 /SOC 161  
    A developmental and interactional approach to understanding family studies and aids in understanding family life, with a primary emphasis on contemporary families. Relevant theoretical perspectives of how families operate are discussed. Areas covered include trends in family structures and functions globally, conducting research in family studies from a global perspective, diversity among families, gender roles in dating and marital relationships from a global perspective, communication and conflict resolution, human sexuality in contextual relationships, dating and singlehood, combining work and family roles, trends from a global perspective on parenting, effects of race and class on families, domestic violence, and divorce and remarriage.
  
  • CDFR 310 - Child Observation and Assessment


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CDFR 218  or ECED 112  or ECSP 112   or instructor permission
    Examines the appropriate use of assessment and observational strategies to document children’s behavior, learning, and development. Discusses principles of assessment across contexts. Methods of analysis for observation data are also reviewed.
  
  • CDFR 315 - Introduction to Early Intervention


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CDFR 218 , CDFR 224 , CDFR 310 
    Focuses on early intervention policies and laws that relate to services for children from birth to school age, including the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) and the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) process. Special emphasis is placed on ways to assist families in their roles as team members in the early intervention process, taking social, linguistic, economic, and cultural diversity into consideration. Provides practical information needed when working in early intervention settings.
  
  • CDFR 321 - Preschool Education: Play and Developmentally Appropriate Practices


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CDFR 218  
    Emphasizes play as a developmental process, the primary vehicle for early learning and as the major aspect of the preschool curriculum. Utilizes development theories as the basis for early learning environments. Provides students with knowledge to implement developmentally appropriate curriculum and methods for preschool education programming in multiple settings (e.g., home, classroom, community).
 

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