May 23, 2024  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Credit designation at right of title is expressed in (c) class hours per week, (l) lab or (d) discussion section hours per week, and (cr) number of credits per semester.

 

Critical Languages

  
  • CRLG 262 - Russian IV


    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CRLG 212 or acceptable equivalent
    By the end of this course, the student should be able to communicate in simple terms with an educated native speaker on a topic with which the student is familiar. Ability in reading and writing varies with language

Dance

  
  • DANC 102 - Introduction to Dance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores dance as communication, ritual, social engagement, entertainment, and as an art form. Dance history, genealogy, aesthetics, critical analysis and response, and the creative process are examined. Class experience includes viewing and critical analysis of professional dance works, attending at least two live productions, and engaging in the creative process in practice and performance.
  
  • DANC 150 - Fundamentals of Dance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A basic dance technique that sequentially develops the elements of movement (space, time, force) into a variety of dance genres and period styles. Covers special care and safety of the instrument—the body.
  
  • DANC 210 - Dance and Somatics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Investigates movement, emphasizing internal perception including traditional and contemporary techniques based in Conditioning, Psychotherapy, and Spiritual Movement as they apply to dance and health. Pilates Based Exercise, Yoga, Contact Improvisation, Alexander Technique, and Body Work methods will be embodied and analyzed with emphasis placed on safe practices. Open to dancers, actors, athletes and non-dancers of all levels.
  
  • DANC 220 - Women and Dance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores gender roles through experiential movement and the embodiment of popular key genres and dances including current trends. An interdisciplinary, multi-perspective, survey of the roles of women and dance from a historical, cultural, and spiritual vantage point followed by reflective writing and discussion. Requires a final performance project.
  
  • DANC 250 - Beginning Modern Dance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Beginning modern dance technique. An introduction to the beginning elements of the choreographic process. Examines the historical development and cultural influences on the changing philosophies of modern dance performance. Performance of creative work required.
  
  • DANC 260 - Beginning Jazz Dance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Beginning jazz technique, dynamics, and selected styles that reflect an era or culture characteristic of jazz movement and music from the 1920s through the present. An introduction to the beginning elements of the choreographic process. Performance of creative work required.
  
  • DANC 270 - Beginning Ballroom and Tap Dance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A sequential development of beginning tap and ballroom dance techniques in the context of the historical development and period styles. Performance of creative work is required.
  
  • DANC 280 - Beginning Ballet


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A sequential development of beginning barre and center techniques that progress to link movement phrasing into dance sequences and choreography. The historical periods of development and the status of the art today are examined in a cultural context, which includes gender and minority influences. Performance of creative work is required.
  
  • DANC 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • DANC 290 - Ethnic Dance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Includes dance techniques from a variety of indigenous forms from western and eastern cultures. Presented in the historical and social context. An emphasis is given to the needs of theater production.
  
  • DANC 350 - Intermediate Modern I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DANC 250  or by permission of the instructor
    Furthers the development of the dancer at the intermediate level in Modern technique. Integrates both technique and artistic growth, along with increased knowledge of artists and styles of the genre. Includes active participation in all class exercises and performances, analyzes, interprets, and composes original choreography based on historical and current works.
  
  • DANC 351 - Choreography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Three introductory- or advanced-level dance classes from DANC 250 , DANC 260 , DANC 270 , DANC 280 , DANC 290 , DANC 485 , or instructor permission
    Introduces the necessary choreographic tools needed to manipulate dance as a medium to create dance works. Students learn and use various approaches to the choreographic process to create dance works, one of which will be presented in a public showing at the end of the semester.
  
  • DANC 353 - Dance Curriculum and Instruction


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Three introductory- or advanced-level dance classes from DANC 250 , DANC 260 , DANC 270 , DANC 280 , DANC 290 , DANC 485 , or instructor permission
    Introduces the necessary teaching skills and curriculum development needed to understand the pedagogical structure for teaching dance. Students learn the approaches to teaching that are unique to dance and will learn to design dance curriculum.
  
  • DANC 354 - Pedagogy of Ballet I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DANC 380  or instructor permission
    Studies the methods of teaching ballet from a multi-perspective approach from pre-ballet to beginning levels for children and adults. Researches age appropriate ballet exercises, historical ballet perspectives, pedagogical philosophies of ballet, critical analysis of ballet, ballet terminology, five methods of teaching ballet, safe teaching practices, kinesiology, gender, adaptive and current developments.
  
  • DANC 355 - Dance Production: Administration to Creation


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Two introductory- or advanced-level dance classes from DANC 250 , DANC 260 , DANC 270 , DANC 280 , DANC 290 , DANC 485 , or instructor permission
    A sequential development of the dance production process from audition to opening, focusing on the practical application to private studio and academic and professional settings. Explores the evolution of dance production and the future of dance, from both administrative and artistic perspectives, taking into consideration the constantly changing world of technology.
  
  • DANC 360 - Intermediate Jazz I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DANC 260  or by permission of the instructor
    Furthers the development of the dancer at the intermediate level in Jazz technique. Integrates both technique and artistic growth, along with increased knowledge of artists and styles of the genre. Includes active participation in all class exercises and performances, analyzes, interprets, and composes original choreography based on historical and current works.
  
  • DANC 380 - Intermediate Ballet I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DANC 280  or by permission of the instructor
    Develop and perform ballet technique by combining the Vaganova, Cecchetti, and French training methods of teaching. Classes will include a warm-up, barre work, center work (au milieu) and large movements across the floor (grand allegro). Students will actively participate in all class exercises and performances, analyze, interpret, and compose historical, current, and original works at an intermediate level.
  
  • DANC 450 - Intermediate Modern II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DANC 250  and DANC 350 , or by permission of the instructor 
    Furthers the development of the dancer at the advanced intermediate level in Modern technique. Development in dance requires the integration of both technique and aitistic growth, along with increased knowledge of artists and styles of the genre. Students will actively participate in all class exercises and performances, analyze, interpret, and compose original choreography based on historical and current works at an advanced intermediate level.
  
  • DANC 460 - Intermediate Jazz II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DANC 260  and DANC 360 , or by permission of the instructor
    Furthers the development of the dancer at the advanced intermediate level in Jazz technique.  Development in dance requires the integration of both technique and artistic growth, along with increased knowledge of artists and styles of the genre. Students will actively participate in all class exercises and performances, analyze, interpret, and compose original choreography based on historical and current works at an advanced intermediate level.
  
  • DANC 480 - Intermediate Ballet II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DANC 380  or by permission of the instructor
    Furthers the development of the dancer at an advanced intermediate level in ballet technique by combining the Vaganova, Cecchetti, and French training methods of teaching. Classes will include a warm-up, barre work, center work (au milieu) and large movements across the floor (grand allegro). Students will actively participate in all class exercises and performances, analyze, interpret, and compose historical, current, and original works at an advanced intermediate level.
  
  • DANC 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students.
     
  
  • DANC 485 - Dance Studio


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DANC 250  or DANC 260  or DANC 270  or DANC 280  (beginning technique class taken must be the specific dance genre of the Dance Studio class offered); or by instructor permission
    Furthers the development of the dancer at the intermediate level of a specified genre of dance. Development in dance requires the integration of both technique and artistic development. The specific genres vary from semester to semester, including modern, ballet, tap, and jazz as alternating semester options. Repeatable: May be repeated with a different focus each time.
  
  • DANC 486 - Practicum in Dance


    Class Hours: var
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 0-2

    Prerequisite: Dance major standing or instructor permission
    Develops skills through artistic practice of performance, production, choreography and professional improvement. Engages with faculty-led, professionally modeled productions of dance concerts, ballets, musicals, operas, and dance immersions. Increases competency in dance, choreography, directing, stage management, design/technology, dance research and professional immersion opportunities in a focused area of interest and certification. Repeatable course required of all dance majors.
  
  • DANC 487 - Practicum in Dance Senior Project


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Develops and presents a culminating capstone experience through individualized instruction. Students will synthesize prior learning and experiences into a project proposal that is uniquely suited to their post-graduation plan. To realize their proposal, students will apply professional practices and methods to document research, preparation, program/document development and production/performance/presentation. Each project will culminate in a form of public presentation.

Disability Services

  
  • DISB 103 - Special Education Technology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Addresses the use of assistive technology in the classroom in areas of communication, mobility, education, recreation, vocation, independence, and therapy/rehabilitation. Emphasizes developing awareness of the diversity of assistive technology currently available for individuals with disabilities. Presents specific applications of assistive technology devices, which improve and maintain the functioning capabilities of individuals with disabilities. Includes independent learning activities and information that enables the students to gather information about assistive technology devices, companies, and related services. (Also offered as EDEX 103 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 111 - Introduction to Exceptional Persons


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Department majors, dual majors, ECED majors, minors, and official incoming transfers only
    Surveys characteristics, needs, problems, and behavior patterns of individuals who have disabilities or who are gifted. Develops an understanding and knowledge of individuals with sensory, behavioral, physical, cognitive, language, and learning disabilities. Includes history and legislative bases of special education. (Also offered as EDEX 111 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 114 - Atypical Development in Infants, Children, and Adolescents


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSYC 101 , DISB 111 /EDEX 111 
    Emphasizes foundations of human growth from conception to age 21, plus atypical development related to special needs with regard to cognitive, physical, and socialemotional development. Provides a foundation for the understanding of the needs of students with developmental disabilities ranging from early intervention to the end of their high school years. (Also offered as EDEX 114 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 201 - Customized Employment: Disability Awareness


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A historical perspective and stereotypical treatment of persons with disabilities, the impact of community integration and empowered living for persons with disabilities, the capabilities and challenges faced by persons with various disabilities. Also considers how current issues, such as health care, housing, Social Security, and employment, have on the lives of persons with disabilities.
  
  • DISB 302 - Customized Employment: Service Coordination


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DISB 201 
    An overview of the Intellectual and Developmental Disability Service System, consumer controlled services and available waivers for persons with disabilities. Also makes the distinction between supported employment and customized employment and the supports available in print, via the Intellectual and Developmental Disability Service System agencies and legislation.
  
  • DISB 340 - Introduction to Behavior Management in Special Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DISB 111  /EDEX 111 , DISB 114 /EDEX 114 , PSYC 101  
    An overview of systematic behavioral change techniques for use with students in a variety of special education settings, including integrated, resource, self-contained, special school, and residential. Emphasizes a case analysis approach to creating and evaluating behavioral changes for students with mild to severe disabilities. (Also offered as EDEX 340 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 369 - Education of Persons with Emotional/ Behavioral Disorders, Learning Disabilities, or Brain Injury


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on major theoretical positions regarding etiology of emotional/ behavioral disorders, learning disabilities and brain injury; definition and identification of the populations; and educational approaches. Reviews research in the field, including current issues, trends, educational practices, and services. Uses a variety of instructional approaches (e.g., cooperative learning, simulations, role-playing) to facilitate acquisition of new knowledge and skills. (Also offered as EDEX 369; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 369 - Education of Persons with Emotional/ Behavioral Disorders, Learning Disabilities or Brain Injury


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on major theoretical positions regarding etiology of emotional/behavioral disorders, learning disabilities and brain injury; definition and identification of the populations; and educational approaches. Reviews research in the field, including current issues, trends, educational practices, and services. Uses a variety of instructional approaches (e.g., cooperative learning, simulations, role-playing) to facilitate acquisition of new knowledge and skills. (Also offered as EDEX 369 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 378 - Education of Persons with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities and Physical/Multiple Disabilities


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on major theoretical positions regarding etiology of intellectual disabilities,  developmental disabilities, a wide and diverse range of physical/ multiple disabilities, and other health impairments. Discusses definitions, population characteristics, and educational approaches. Reviews research in the field, including current issues, trends, practices, and services. (Also offered as EDEX 378; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 378 - Education of Persons with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities and Physical/Multiple Disabilities


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on major theoretical positions regarding etiology of intellectual disabilities, developmental disabilities, a wide and diverse range of physical/ multiple disabilities, and other health impairments. Discusses definitions, population characteristics, and educational approaches. Reviews research in the field, including current issues, trends, practices, and services. (Also offered as EDEX 378 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 403 - Customized Employment: Assessment and Job Development


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DISB 302 
    A holistic approach to providing job-coach services in community setting. Content emphasizes understanding the processes involved in bringing a consumer through the Vocational/Transition Assessment process, developing and analyzing potential jobs based on consumer assessment data, the development and implementation of accommodations for consumers with behavioral/psychiatric disorders, as well as the impact the American with Disabilities Act has on the provision of Job Coaching services.
  
  • DISB 404 - Customized Employment: Systematic Instruction and Fading


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: DISB 403 
    A holistic approach to providing job coach services in community setting. Content emphasizes understanding the three essential components of systematic instruction, the development and implementation of instructional programs that include comprehensive fading and follow-up plans and the collection, graphing, and analysis of the assessment, instructional, and follow-up data.
  
  • DISB 440 - Ethical and Professional Behavior


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Emphasizes ethical and professional behavior for educational professionals working with individuals with special needs. Focuses on responsible and ethical conduct as it relates to interaction with students and other professionals in direct service, instructional, and/or supervisory roles. Addresses legal implications related to these roles. (Also offered as EDEX 440 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 458 - Transition Assessment and Planning for Youth with Disabilities


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Reviews litigation and legislation leading to the legal requirement for the provision of Transition Planning for adolescents with disabilities to include post-secondary education and training, employment, and community living outcomes. Develops competencies in the skills necessary to help students with disabilities make a successful transition from school to adult life. Addresses the importance self-determination and other personalsocial characteristics that must be identified and supported by the transition team throughout the transition planning/implementation process. (Also offered as EDEX 458 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 460 - Family Perspectives on Disability


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSYC 101 
    Critically examines families as competent and resourceful systems, students explore ways to collaborate effectively with family members. Focuses on legal and philosophical bases for supporting families in making important decisions affecting the education and care of their children (Also offered as EDEX 460 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DISB 493 - Internship/Field Training


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 12

    Prerequisite: DISB 440  and 2.75 GPA
    Allows the intern to demonstrate competencies working in a public or private agency providing educational/rehabilitation services. This may include, but not be limited to, writing and analyzing comprehensive evaluation reports, counseling individuals with disabilities, understanding agency and/ or service delivery responsibilities and limitations, referral and follow-up processes, and use of various assessment approaches in evaluating an individual’s capacity to function independently in a broad range of community settings. (Offered as EDEX 493 before 2017-18.)

Developmental Studies

  
  • DVST 070 - Reading Skills for College Study


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Assists in the development of college-level reading skills with an emphasis on textbook reading. Includes literal and critical comprehension skills, vocabulary development, and reading efficiency. Carries institutional, nondegree credit. It counts toward financial aid and full-time status, but not toward graduation or GPA. Note: Students who score 250 and below on the ACCUPLACER post-test (administered at the end of this course) are required to enroll in DVST 110 ​  the following semester.
  
  • DVST 083 - Introduction to College Mathematics


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: May not be taken after successfully completing any course offered by the Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences without written Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department chair approval.
    Corequisite: DVST 160  
    Explores basic mathematical skills with an emphasis on conceptual understanding. Provides foundational knowledge needed for success in general education mathematics courses. Utilizes hands-on activities with mathematical manipulatives to develop computational fluency and procedural knowledge. Carries institutional, nondegree credit. May not be taken after successfully completing MATH 100  or higher-level mathematics course without written Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department chair approval. (Offered as DVST 095 before 2015-16.)
  
  • DVST 103 - Principles of Intermediate Algebra


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Appropriate mathematics placement. May not be taken after successfully completing MATH 100  or higher-level course without written Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department chair approval.
    Corequisite: MATH 100  
    Enhances the basic algebra skills needed to succeed inMATH 100  by developing strategies for understanding and retaining algebraic concepts. Improves algebraic thinking and problem solving. May not be taken after successfully completing MATH 100  or higher-level course without written Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department chair approval. Does not meet Liberal Studies math requirements.
  
  • DVST 110 - Introduction to Critical Reading and Thinking


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Note: Students enrolled in DVST 070  who score 250 and below on the ACCUPLACER post-test (administered at the end of DVST 070 ) are required to enroll in DVST 110 the following semester. Open for enrollment for any student.

    Focuses on the development and mastery of skills related to the processes of understanding, analyzing, and assessing college-level texts and other academic readings. Synthesizes written information from a variety of sources and content areas. Note: For sections paired with specific content-area course sections, students are required to register for both courses.

  
  • DVST 150 - Introduction to Higher Education


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Introduces the system of higher education and skills that promote effective educational planning and academic success. Orients students to the systems, resources, policies, and procedures of IUP and to the Liberal Studies curriculum. Emphasizes goal setting, decision making, self-monitoring, and time-management skills.
  
  • DVST 160 - Learning Strategies


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Encourages students to develop and use effective and efficient study strategies on a consistent basis. Students examine academic goals and implement study strategies to help achieve those goals. Includes the topics of goal setting and self-monitoring, learning styles, test preparation and test taking, lecture and textbook note taking, time management and concentration, and general strategies for learning. Students are required to give evidence of application of the study strategies to other courses in which they are currently enrolled. Active participation in class meetings is expected.
  
  • DVST 170 - Career Exploration


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Introduces the theoretical and practical framework with which to explore careers compatible with overall academic skills, aptitudes, and life goals. Students examine the world of work, assess their interests and abilities, and make realistic decisions on academic majors and careers. (Cross-listed as ADVT 170 . These courses may be substituted for each other and be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.)
  
  • DVST 200 - Academic Transition Seminar


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Recommended for students from regional campuses
    Acclimates the student to the curricular and cocurricular experience of the main campus of IUP. Emphasizes campus systems and resources, the application of theories of change as related to transition, and major and career planning as lifelong learners. Recommended for transfer students, particularly targeting students moving from a satellite campus to the Indiana campus.
  
  • DVST 250 - Role of the Peer Educator: Theory, Practice, and Assessment


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Instructor permission
    Prepares selected students for the role of a peer educator within the higher education setting. Topics include student learning and problem solving, facilitative helping and interpersonal communication, peer leadership, and assisting peers with how to effectively and efficiently succeed at the college level. (Roles include supplemental instruction leader, tutor, peer advisor, workshop leader.)

Early Childhood Education

  
  • ECED 112 - Childhood Development Birth–Age 5


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Presents the foundations, theoretical, and practical aspects of the development of young children, focusing on various learning theories/theorists and the developmental stages and needs of children from birth through age five. Examines the various stages of child development with a focus on a review of the research, theories, and theoretical program models, and types of early childhood programs; discusses available community resources, professional organizations, and standards of ethical behavior and practice all in an exploration of child development and contemporary educational, cultural, social, and emotional issues for children, ages birth to five and their families.
  
  • ECED 117 - Family, Community, and School Relationships in a Diverse Society


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Develop a strong understanding and deep appreciation of the diversity among families, communities, and school cultures in the United States. Locate and develop curricular materials and teaching strategies appropriate to this country’s diversity. Recognize families and communities as competent and resourceful systems. Critically examine ways to collaborate with family members and community agencies to support students with and without disabilities. Focus on legal and philosophical bases for supporting families in making important decisions affecting their children.
  
  • ECED 200 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major or early childhood education major
    Introduces prospective teachers to the historical, sociological, and political aspects of early childhood education. An emphasis is placed on appreciating diversity in the early childhood classroom and on developing keen observation strategies to both heighten understanding of children and evaluate programs that serve them.
  
  • ECED 215 - The Developing Child: K-4th Grade


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces the interrelationships among the various aspects of child development in grades K-4, its relevant theories and educational applications. Through literature review, critique of theories, observation, and large and small group activities, students learn child development principles and how they may be applied in K-4 educational settings to foster successful learning. (Offered as ELED 215 Child Development before 2015-16.)
  
  • ECED 221 - Literature for the Young Child and Adolescent


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major
    A survey of literature for children from preschool to adolescence. Selection and evaluation criteria for various genres, including visual and literary elements, are the foundation. Emphasis will also be placed on multicultural literature and literature for diverse learners. Stresses motivational approaches for encouraging children’s engagement with and response to literature.
  
  • ECED 250 - Language Development


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major or early childhood education major
    Acquaints students with the process of children’s language acquisition and development through expressive skills and language comprehension. Observation, documentation, and assessment of language development across the areas of listening, speaking, writing, drawing, and reading are explored from both a theoretical and practical perspective.
  
  • ECED 280 - Maximizing Learning: Engaging All Learners


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Teacher Education Major
    Examine competencies specific to the science of teaching, the organization and management of functional learning environments, and the design, implementation, and evaluation of developmentally appropriate learning experiences. Explore models of teaching, lesson and unit planning, technology integration, and creating a P-4, 4-8, P12, and/or 7-12 classroom environment that is conducive to learning.
  
  • ECED 310 - Science, Health, and Safety for All PreK to Grade 4 Learners


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major or early childhood education major, admission to Teacher Education Step 1
    Examines strategies for teaching science and health concepts; design of lessons that integrate science, health, and safety; and learning how to become role models for children. Students develop knowledge of how to design lessons with appropriate content and methods for young children.
  
  • ECED 351 - Literacy for the Emergent Reader: PreK to Grade 1 Learners


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education/Special Education Major or Early Childhood Education Major
    Provides early childhood teachers with various strategies, techniques, and materials related to developing early literacy in children. Current research and practical applications are interwoven to ensure a systematic coverage of the most recent methods and best practices. Focuses on the development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills for PreK to Grade 1 learners.
  
  • ECED 411 - Social Studies for All PreK to Grade 4 Learners


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major or early childhood education major, admission to Teacher Education Step 1
    An overview of social concepts related to geography, history, economics, civics and government, and citizenship. Prepares teacher candidates to offer classroom instruction to all preK to grade 4 learners, which builds civic competence and enables students to use skills of collaboration, decision making, and problem solving.
  
  • ECED 425 - Methods of Teaching and Assessing Language Arts: Pre-K to Grade 4 Learners


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Restriction: Early Childhood Education (ECED) major or Special Education PreK-12 (SPCE) major

    Emphasizes the art of communication as an interrelated process. Develops and integrates language arts throughout the curriculum. Explores methods for teaching and assessing developmentally- appropriate oral and written communication, spelling, handwriting, and vocabulary. Gives special emphasis to developmental writing approaches.s.
  
  • ECED 451 - Literacy for the Developing Reader: Grades 2-4 Learners


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major or early childhood education major, admission to Teacher Education Step 1
    Provides preservice teachers with theoretical context, as well as various strategies, techniques, and materials related to teaching literacy skills, developing positive dispositions toward literacy, and fostering supportive environments for literacy development. Instructional issues, specifically related to teaching reading to young children, children with disabilities, and English language learners, are investigated. Contemporary research on theoretical perspectives and best practices, as well as practical application, is interwoven to ensure a balanced approach to the most effective instructional practices.
  
  • ECED 499 - Advocacy and Collaboration in Diverse Families and Communities


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Provides students with understanding and skills in multicultural approaches to education that enable them to recognize and respect the diversities that all their students bring to school and to also become effective advocates as they collaborate successfully with diverse families and communities.

Economics

  
  • ECON 101 - Basic Economics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Scarcity, role of prices in determining production and the allocation of resources, business cycle analysis, policy options for reducing unemployment and inflation, economic role of government, international trade, and selected current economic problems are studied. For those who do not plan to take more than 3cr of economics. Note: May not be taken after successful completion of or concurrent registration in any other Economics course.
  
  • ECON 121 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Nature and methodology of economics; mixed capitalism and market economy; national income; employment theory, including economics of fiscal policy; money, banking, and Federal Reserve System; international trade and finance.
  
  • ECON 122 - Principles of Microeconomics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Economics of firm; theory of consumer demand; determination of price and output in different market structures; distribution of income; economic growth.
  
  • ECON 143 - Financial Wellness


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Theories and principles related to the physical, social, and emotional wellness aspects of individual money management. Information is focused on building a sound financial foundation as a college student and can be applied throughout the life span to ensure future financial well-being. Successful completion fulfills the Liberal Studies Dimensions of Wellness requirement.
  
  • ECON 223 - Economics of Crime


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Economic analysis of criminal activity and its impact on the allocation of scarce resources. Uses fundamental economic models to explain crimes against people, property crime, “victimless crime,” and organized crime.
  
  • ECON 239 - Economics of Sports


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces and develops the economic way of thinking as it applies to the sports industry. Topics covered include the organizational structure of major American sports leagues (e.g., revenue sharing, salary restrictions, and competitive balance), labor issues in sports (e.g., free agency, reserve clause, unions, strikes, and discrimination), the legal relationship between sports and government (e.g., the relationship between antitrust law and sports), and the issue of sports and public finance (e.g., location and financing of sports franchise and public ownership of stadiums and arenas).
  
  • ECON 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • ECON 325 - Monetary Economics I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122 
    Organization, operation, and economic significance of US monetary institutions; commercial banks and Federal Reserve System; survey of monetary theory and policy; mechanism of international payments.
  
  • ECON 330 - Labor Economics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122 
    History, structure, and operation of trade unions and employer organizations; major federal labor legislation; collective bargaining theory; wage determination; current labor problems.
  
  • ECON 331 - Industrial Organization


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 122  or instructor permission
    Social effectiveness of industries analyzed through measures of market structure, market conduct, and market performance.
  
  • ECON 335 - Public Finance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122 , or instructor permission
    Taxation and expenditure theory at the federal level; federal budget and debt considerations; public sector impact on economy.
  
  • ECON 338 - Poverty in Africa


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 101  or ECON 121  or ECON 122 
    Examines African poverty as an economic as well as a social phenomenon. It investigates the many sided nature of poverty and the importance of going beyond generalizations about the poor, including the various causes of poverty in Africa. It stresses the powerful ill effects of a combination of sluggish past economic growth, widening income inequalities, and anti-poverty strategies implemented by many African nations.
  
  • ECON 339 - Economic Development I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122  or instructor permission
    Introduces the following concepts: theory of growth; theory of economic development of underdeveloped countries.
  
  • ECON 343 - Economic History of the United States


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 101  or ECON 121  or ECON 122 
    Applications of economic theory and models of economic development to the main patterns of US post revolutionary growth; emphasizes the history of economic development as a laboratory for testing economic hypotheses.
  
  • ECON 345 - International Trade


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122  or instructor permission
    A study of the microeconomic segment of international specialization and exchange, including theories of international trade and their application to commercial policies, historical survey and examination of current problems of international trade, and the institutional setting of international trade.
  
  • ECON 346 - International Finance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122  or instructor permission
    A study of the macroeconomic segment of international specialization and exchange, including analysis of balance of payments, exchange rates, and the mechanism of international economic and monetary adjustments; international macroeconomic policy; historical survey and examination of current international financial problems; and the institutional setting of international payments.
  
  • ECON 355 - Statistics for Economists


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121  or ECON 122  or instructor permission
    An introduction to economic statistics, including frequency  distributions, probability, distributions of random variables, functions of random variables, and tests of economic hypotheses.
  
  • ECON 356 - Introduction to Econometrics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 355  or its equivalent or instructor permission
    An introduction to econometrics, including linear normal regression models of two or more random variables, special econometric problems, and solutions of simultaneous equations.
  
  • ECON 360 - Health Economics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 101  or ECON 122 
    Analyzes the market for healthcare: demand by individual consumers and supply by health workers and hospitals. Considers the problems of information, risk, and externalities in making health decisions and the role of insurance. Explores public health policies, both in a world and domestic context. Introduces economic methods for program/policy research: elasticity estimation, cost-benefit analysis, and supply-demand modeling.
  
  • ECON 361 - Environmental Economics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 101  or ECON 122 
    An examination of economic costs and benefits of environmental control and modification. Techniques of economic analysis are used to understand economic aspects of environmental problems and contribute toward their solution.
  
  • ECON 362 - Global Poverty and Health


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 101  or ECON 122  
    Researches information related to global trends in health and poverty and examines theories related to the economic, social, and political forces behind these trends. Economically analyzes the barriers preventing greater access to and usage of health services in poor communities, such as asymmetric information, monopoly provision, and externalities. Critically examines health service provision from opposite economic spectrums: (1) as Global Public Goods and (2) as micro-programs targeting specific populations. Covers case studies of health initiatives in developing countries and their economic impacts.
  
  • ECON 421 - Macroeconomic Analysis


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122  and (MATH 107 /MATH 108  or MATH 121  or MATH 125 ); or instructor permission
    Emphasizes aggregate income levels and problems of unemployment, inflation, and growth. Covers consumption and investment theories and the role of fiscal and monetary policy.
  
  • ECON 422 - Microeconomic Analysis


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122 , MATH 121  or equivalent
    Consumer behavior, theory of the firm, theory of exchange, market structures, distribution, general equilibrium theory, welfare economics.
  
  • ECON 434 - Managerial Economics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 121 , ECON 122 , and (MATH 107 /MATH 108  or MATH 121  or MATH 125 )
    Applications of economic theory using algebra, elementary statistics, and calculus to solve managerial optimization problems including problems of forecasting and risk.
  
  • ECON 456 - Advanced Econometrics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ECON 356  or equivalent or instructor permission
    Provides a more thorough understanding of the theory and practice of econometrics introduced in ECON 356 . Students increase their proficiency in econometric analysis and improve their research skills by extending their research agendas begun in ECON 356  and through exposure to the scholarly literature. Students learn about a variety of topics related to regression analysis, including violations of the Classical assumptions, extensions of the basic regression model, and advanced techniques.
  
  • ECON 480 - Seminar


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Instructor permission
    A seminar in selected economic issues or problems.
  
  • ECON 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Instructor permission
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students.
  
  • ECON 483 - Honors Thesis


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite: Admission to departmental honors program; prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    An intensive, focused study involving independent research culminating in a written thesis approved by a thesis director and two faculty readers/committee members. Repeatable: May be taken more than once to a maximum of 6cr.
  
  • ECON 493 - Internship in Economics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 2-12

    Prerequisite: Economics major who has completed at least 12cr in economics and has at least a 2.5 GPA in the major and in all course work
    Provides on-the-job experience in economics positions with private and governmental employers. The student is also required to complete related academic work in the form of papers and selected readings. Number of credits earned depends on the nature of the job and amount of time involved in internship. A maximum of 6cr earned in this course may be counted toward the 30cr in economics requirement for economics majors.

Early Childhood/Special Education

  
  • ECSP 112 - Growth and Development: Typical and Atypical


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Presents the foundations, theories, and research findings on human growth from conception, including basic embryogenesis, up to early adolescence. Examines various aspects of child development with an emphasis on biological, cultural, educational, and parental influences that shape children, as well as selective examples of typical and atypical cognitive, physical, and social-emotional development.
  
  • ECSP 314 - Creative Experiences and Play for All PreK to Grade 4 Learners


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major or early childhood education major
    Provides teacher candidates with the knowledge and skills necessary to incorporate creative music, art, drama, movement, and play activities into a comprehensive early childhood inclusive curriculum. How integration of creative experiences and play will enhance and encourage the development of all preK to grade 4 learners is emphasized, as is the historical, theoretical, and research base for the integration of play and creative experiences into a fully inclusive classroom.
  
  • ECSP 340 - Introduction to Classroom and Behavior Management


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 01
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major
    An overview of classroom organization and management, along with systematic behavior change techniques required for effective teaching and enhanced student learning for all children in preK through grade 4 and students identified with special needs or at-risk through grade 8. The research-based classroom management and behavioral techniques can be used to create a positive learning environment for all students in an inclusive setting.
  
  • ECSP 440 - Professional Seminar: Teacher as Researcher and Advocate for All PreK to Grade 4 Learners


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education major, successful completion of Teacher Education Step 1, admission to Teacher Education Step 2, concurrent enrollment in EDUC 461 , EDUC 471 
    Provides support in a teacher candidate’s ongoing professional development. Emphasizes guidelines for professional etiquette, ethical behavior, professional practice, and effective interpersonal relations with teachers, paraprofessionals, school and agency personnel, parents, and students. Facilitates work in engaging in informed advocacy efforts on behalf of children and the profession and examining the theoretical and research base for classroom practices.

Education of Exceptional Persons

  
  • EDEX 103 - Special Education Technology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Addresses the use of assistive technology in the classroom in areas of communication, mobility, education, recreation, vocation, independence, and therapy/rehabilitation. Emphasizes developing awareness of the diversity of assistive technology currently available for individuals with disabilities. Presents specific applications of assistive technology devices, which improve and maintain the functioning capabilities of individuals with disabilities. Includes independent learning activities and information that enables the students to gather information about assistive technology devices, companies, and related services. (Also offered as DISB 103 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • EDEX 110 - Introduction to Special Needs PreK to Grade 8


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Early childhood education/special education majors only
    Surveys characteristics, needs, problems, and behavior patterns of any child who deviates sufficiently from typical to be considered disabled or at risk for disability. Consideration to children who fall intellectually both above and below average and those who are disabled visually, acoustically, behaviorally, orthopedically, neurologically, or in respect to speech patterns. Focuses on children from birth to adolescence.
  
  • EDEX 111 - Introduction to Exceptional Persons


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Department majors, dual majors, ECED majors, minors, and official incoming transfers only
    Surveys characteristics, needs, problems, and behavior patterns of individuals who have disabilities or who are gifted. Students develop an understanding and knowledge of individuals with sensory, behavioral, physical, cognitive, language, and learning disabilities. Acquaints students with history and legislative bases of special education. (Also offered as DISB 111 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • EDEX 114 - Atypical Development in Infants, Children, and Adolescents


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSYC 101 , EDEX 111 /DISB 111 
    Emphasizes foundations of human growth from conception to age 21, plus atypical development related to special needs with regard to cognitive, physical, and socialemotional development. Provides a foundation for the understanding of the needs of students with developmental disabilities ranging from early intervention to the end of their high school years. (Also offered as DISB 114 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
 

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