Jun 13, 2024  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Credit designation at right of title is expressed in (c) class hours per week, (l) lab or (d) discussion section hours per week, and (cr) number of credits per semester.

 

Nuclear Medicine Technology

  
  • NMDT 428 - Radiation Physics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Applicable aspects of nuclear and atomic physics are covered both in theory and mathematical formulae. Theoretical topics include atomic and nuclear structure, radioactive decay, interactions with matter, and radionuclide production methods. Mathematical concepts discussed are the decay equation, equilibrium, and radiation dosimetry.
  
  • NMDT 429 - Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 1
    Credits: 3

    Covers the basic principles of both in vitro and in vivo instrumentation. Also covers the design, operation, and quality control of gas detectors and scintillation detectors. Survey equipment, spectrometers, and stationary imaging devices are presented with their application to nuclear medicine. Includes hands-on laboratory experience with single channel analyzers and Anger cameras.
  
  • NMDT 430 - Radiation Biology and Radiation Protection


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Topics include ionization and energy transfer; molecules, cellular, tissue, and organ response to radiation; acute and chronic effects of radiation; radiation protection; licensing requirements; recordkeeping; and management of clinical radiation spills.
  
  • NMDT 431 - In Vivo/In Vitro Nonimaging


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    In vivo clinical nuclear medicine procedures not resulting in images as well as principles of in vitro radioassay are presented. Included are venipuncture, blood volumes, red cell studies, Schillings test, principles of immunology, various types of radioassay, and sensitivity and specificity of procedure.
  
  • NMDT 432 - Radiopharmaceuticals


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Topics include tracer theory, pharmacological actions, localization methods, radiopharmaceutical properties, radionuclide generators, radiopharmaceutical preparations and quality control, and transient vs. secular equilibrium. Routinely used radiopharmaceuticals are discussed.
  
  • NMDT 433 - Introduction to Tomographic Imaging


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    An introduction to the basic principles of cross-sectional anatomy and tomographic imaging is presented. Topics include body planes and cross-sectional anatomy of the heart, brain, liver, and lumbar spine, as applicable to nuclear medicine, and the theory and application of both SPECT and PET imaging systems.
  
  • NMDT 434 - Clinical Nuclear Medicine


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 40
    Credits: 16

    Prerequisite: Completion of 77cr at IUP and Phase I at NMI
    Student completes 1,320 hours of supervised clinical training at an affiliate hospital. Gives instruction and participates in the performance of various clinical nuclear medicine procedures, patient care, administrative duties, radiopharmaceutical preparation and quality control, equipment quality control, quality assurance, and radiation safety. Develops both technical skills and interpersonal communication skills for incorporation into the medical community and to provide high-quality patient care. Offered on a pass/fail basis only.

Nanomanufacturing Technology

  
  • NMTT 311 - Materials, Safety, and Equipment Overview for Nanofabrication


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Corequisite: NMTT 312 
    Focuses on cleanroom protocol and provides an overview of the materials, safety, and equipment issues encountered in the practice of “top down” and “bottom up” nanofabrication.
  
  • NMTT 312 - Basic Nanofabrication Processes


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Corequisite: NMTT 311 
    A hands-on introduction to the processing sequences involved in “top down,” “bottom up,” and hybrid nanofabrication. Focuses on a step-by-step description of the processes integration needed to fabricate devices and structures.
  
  • NMTT 313 - Thin Films in Nanofabrication


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Corequisite: NMTT 311  and NMTT 312 
    Provides a detailed understanding of the use and processing of thin film materials in nanofabrication. Emphasizes the understanding and operation of the state-of-the-art deposition and etching processing equipment in the Penn State Nanofabrication Facility cleanrooms.
  
  • NMTT 314 - Lithography and Patterning Techniques


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Corequisite: NMTT 311 
    Provides knowledge and hands-on treatment to all aspects of advanced lithography and pattern generation processes, covering topics from substrate preparation to exposure using pattern transfer equipment such as stamping and embossing, ion and e-beam, and optical contact and stepper.
  
  • NMTT 315 - Materials Modifications in Nanofabrication


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Corequisite: NMTT 311 
    Provides detailed knowledge of the processing steps used in modifying material properties in nanofabrication, including molecular functionalization, cross-linking, metal silicidation, material oxidation, material nitridation, barrier materials, alloying, stress control, annealing, and doping.
  
  • NMTT 316 - Characterization, Packaging, and Testing of Nanofabrication Structures


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Corequisite: NMTT 311 
    Addresses the issues and examines a variety of techniques and measurements essential for testing and controlling the final device fabrication, performance, and packaging.

Nursing

  
  • IMAG 101 - Careers in Medical Imaging


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Explores various imaging tracts including Nuclear Medicine Technology, Echocardiography, and Diagnostic Medical Sonography (Ultrasound). Examines the current health care environment and discusses regulatory bodies required for professional credentials. Discusses aspects of culturally centric care. Provides opportunities for effective communication techniques to enhance student-patient interaction.
  
  • IMAG 480 - Medical Imaging Seminar


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: Medical Imaging major; Junior standing
    Builds on the natural science and liberal studies curriculum. Focuses on fundamental concepts that apply to the practice of medical imaging. Addresses elements of quality and safety in the healthcare environment, interpersonal communication in the workplace, and code of ethics and legal frameworks that impact healthcare decisions.
  
  • NURS 101 - Disaster Awareness


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    A basic understanding of the essentials of disaster planning, responding to mass casualty incidents, and postdisaster restoration of basic public health. Introduces a basic overview of health issues caused by biological, chemical, explosive, and natural disasters.
  
  • NURS 143 - Healthy People—Promoting Wellness


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An introduction to the pathway of health and wellness through contributions to one’s environment and community. The interconnectedness of self, others, nature, and society on one’s health and wellness is emphasized. Students are guided through decision-making processes regarding life choices to maximize personal well-being. A personal wellness plan that incorporates aspects of physical and social health is developed using the Healthy People framework. Completion of NURS 143 fulfills the Liberal Studies Dimensions of Wellness requirement. Other 143 courses will also fulfill this requirement, and any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.
  
  • NURS 202 - Foundations of Child Health


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on conditions that affect the health of children. An overview of the structure and function of selected body systems. Emphasizes the development of each system during infancy and childhood. The impact of common acute and chronic diseases on children is incorporated. Health promotion concepts are addressed.
  
  • NURS 211 - Fundamentals I Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Nursing majors only, BIOL 150  grade of “C” or better; CHEM 101 , CHEM 102 ; sophomore standing; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 212  or permission
    Presents concepts and basic nursing skills fundamental to the safe practice of professional nursing. A foundation for students to build their professional knowledge base as well as develop interpersonal and psychomotor skills in a variety of settings with a focus on patient-centered care for adults and older adults.
  
  • NURS 212 - Fundamentals I Theory


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Nursing majors only, BIOL 150  grade of “C” or better; CHEM 101 , CHEM 102 ; sophomore standing; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 211  or permission
    Introduces students to the nursing discipline, nursing process, professional standards, and values that are foundational to practice. Provides an overview of the various levels of healthcare services and the professional nursing role. Concepts for effective nurse-client relationships are examined including therapeutic communication, evidence-based nursing interventions, quality patient-centered care, and safe nursing practice.
  
  • NURS 213 - Fundamentals II Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: NURS 211 , NURS 212  with grades of “C” or better
    Corequisite: NURS 214 , NURS 236 ; or permission
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 240 

    Builds on the Fundamentals I Clinical course. Opportunities for students to continue to develop professional knowledge and skills with diverse individuals and families in a variety of settings with a focus on adults and older adults. Emphasizes developing the ability to perform comprehensive health assessments, use therapeutic communication, and provide basic nursing skills while promoting safe and quality health care.
  
  • NURS 214 - Health Assessment


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: NURS 211 , NURS 212  with grades of “C” or better
    Corequisite: NURS 213 , NURS 236 ; or permission
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 240  with a grade of “C” or better

    An introduction to basic health assessment for the purpose of determining a client’s health status. Students learn to conduct a comprehensive health history and physical assessment on adults and older adults. Incorporates concepts of human anatomy and physiology in the assessment of clients. Identifies appropriate nursing interventions to promote health.
  
  • NURS 236 - Fundamentals II Theory


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: NURS 211 , NURS 212  with grades of “C” or better
    Corequisite: NURS 213 , NURS 214 ; or permission
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 240  with a grade of “C” or better

    Introduces students to fundamental nursing concepts that apply to the practice of professional nursing. Topics include elements of holistic care, promotion of psychosocial and physiologic health, and introduction to medication administration in nursing practice. Provides physiological rationale for nursing interventions with a focus on knowledge and skills to ensure safe delivery of nursing care.
  
  • NURS 306 - Problem Solving in Nursing


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: NURS 213, 214, and 236 or special permission
    Opportunities to recognize and develop intervention strategies for problem solving in clinical nursing situations. Emphasizes developing application and analysis skills required for success in the Nursing program.
  
  • NURS 311 - Introduction to Nursing Informatics


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: NURS 211 , NURS 212 , NURS 213 , NURS 214 , NURS 236 
    An introduction to basic nursing informatics for the purpose of role development of the emerging contemporary nurse. Incorporates concepts of metastructures and tools used in the workflow process. Examines legislative, cultural, and safety aspects. Discusses current and future applications emerging from the science of informatics.
  
  • NURS 312 - Professional Nursing


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: ENGL 202  
    Corequisite: NURS 330  and NURS 331 ; or NURS 332  and NURS 333 ; or NURS 336  and NURS 337 ; or permission 
    Examines values, cultural issues, code of ethics, global and national health care policy, regulatory environments, professional standards and legal frameworks that impact health care decisions, determine professional conduct, and guide interactions with clients, families, and health care team members. Utilizes ethical decision-making frameworks to guide professional nursing practice. Focuses on developing the necessary skills to engage in scholarly writings and presentation.
  
  • NURS 314 - Health Policy and Law


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on understanding the evolution of healthcare policy, health law, and federal and state regulation of healthcare financing programs. Introduces healthcare policy making; critical health policy issues; legislative, regulatory, and legal challenges; and legislative and political processes that impact the healthcare delivery system in the United States. (Cross-listed as ELR 314 .)
  
  • NURS 316 - Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 202 , MATH 217  
    Corequisite: NURS 330  and NURS 331 ; or NURS 332  and NURS 333 ; or NURS 336  and NURS 337 ; or permission 
    Focuses on understanding and critiquing nursing research. Emphasizes understanding the research process and utilization of current evidence in nursing practice. Focuses on developing the necessary skills to engage in scholarly writing and presentation.
  
  • NURS 330 - Care of the Child and Family


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212 , PSYC 215 , grades of “C” or better in BIOL 240 , BIOL 241 , NURS 213 , NURS 214 , NURS 236 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 331 , NURS 312  or NURS 316 ; or permission
    Focuses on knowledge essential to providing nursing care to the child and family. Emphasizes prevention, recognition, implementation of the nursing process, and appropriate interventions for safe care of the child. Applies evidence-based practice for the care of children and families.
  
  • NURS 331 - Care of the Child and Family Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 6
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212 , PSYC 215 , grades of “C” or better in BIOL 240 , BIOL 241 , NURS 213 , NURS 214 , NURS 236 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 330 , NURS 312  or NURS 316 ; or permission
    Provides students with opportunities to apply the nursing process with children and their families in a variety of settings and demonstrate nursing professionalism in their interactions with individuals, families, and community. Increases students’ ability to perform comprehensive health assessments and collaborate with members of the health care team to identify problems, plan, intervene, and evaluate care for children and families. Emphasizes safe, comprehensive, evidence-based nursing care, and professional standards of practice.
  
  • NURS 332 - Maternal-Neonatal Health


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212 , PSYC 215 ; grades of “C” or better in BIOL 240 , BIOL 241 , NURS 213 , NURS 214 , NURS 236 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 333 , NURS 312  or NURS 316 ; or permission
    Focuses on knowledge essential to providing nursing care for pregnant women, neonates, and postpartum patients within a family context. Emphasizes implementation of the nursing process and appropriate interventions for safe care. Applies evidence-based practice for the care of pregnant women, neonates, and postpartum patients.
  
  • NURS 333 - Maternal-Neonatal Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 6
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212 , PSYC 215 ; grades of “C” or better in BIOL 240 , BIOL 241 , NURS 213 , NURS 214 , NURS 236 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 332 , NURS 312  or NURS 316 ; or permission
    Provides students opportunities to apply the nursing process with pregnant women, neonates, postpartum patients, and their families in a variety of settings and demonstrate nursing professionalism in their interactions with individuals, families, and community. Increases students’ ability to perform comprehensive health assessments and collaborate with members of the health care team to identify problems, plan, intervene, and evaluate care for pregnant women, neonates, postpartum patients, and their families. Emphasizes safe, patient-centered comprehensive, evidence-based nursing care, and professional standards of practice.
  
  • NURS 334 - Transitions in Professional Nursing


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: Prerequisites or Corequisites: ENGL 202 , licensed practical nurse

    Explores the dynamic nature of health and its impact on the practice of nursing. Nursing theories, concepts, and issues related to nursing practice are analyzed. Linkages among theory, research, and practice are explored for relevance and utility.
  
  • NURS 336 - Adult Health I


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212 , PSYC 215 ; grades of “C” or better in BIOL 240 , BIOL 241 , NURS 213 , NURS 214 , NURS 236 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 337 , NURS 312  or NURS 316 ; or permission
    Introduces the student to disease processes and prevention, collaborative care, and implementation of the nursing process for adults and older adults. Enhances student knowledge regarding assessing human response to changing health and applying the appropriate nursing intervention for safe, patient-centered care. Applies evidence-based practice for the care of adults and older adults.
  
  • NURS 337 - Adult Health I Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 15
    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212 , PSYC 215 ; grades of “C” or better in BIOL 240 , BIOL 241 , NURS 213 , NURS 214 , NURS 236 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 336 , NURS 312  or NURS 316 ; or permission
    Provides students with opportunities to apply the nursing process to adults and older adults in a variety of settings and demonstrate nursing professionalism in their interactions with individuals, families, and community. Increases students’ ability to perform comprehensive health assessments and collaborate with members of the health care team to identify problems, plan, intervene, and evaluate care for adults and older adults. Emphasizes safe, patient-centered comprehensive, evidence-based nursing care, and professional standards of practice.
  
  • NURS 410 - Health Promotion and Social Issues


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ANTH 211 , PHIL 122 , SOC 151 
    An introduction to current social issues, models, and evidence-based research in health promotion, disease prevention, and population health relevant to individuals and communities. Explores individual and population health promotion assessment, health behavior interventions, and disease prevention in diverse populations to improve patient and population health outcomes. Develops and implements an intervention and prevention plan which addresses individual and population health problems. Critiques research and evidence-based practice relevant to population health.
  
  • NURS 412 - Nursing Management


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 , NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 330 , NURS 331 , NURS 332 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 436 , NURS 437 , NURS 440  
    Emphasizes leadership, communication and relationship building, knowledge of the health care environment, and resource management. Discusses leadership/management skills and processes. Examines the role of designer/ manager/coordinator of care in professional nursing in depth.
  
  • NURS 414 - Health Policy and Patient Advocacy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing
    Focuses on the legislative, regulatory, political, and advocacy issues including safeguarding autonomy, and promoting the social justice process that impacts the healthcare delivery services in the US. Examines the impact of policy and politics on healthcare, social equity, accessibility, cost, and affordability. Examines their role in health policy development at the federal, state, and local level. Analyzes selected policies for their effect on social issues, healthcare finance and delivery. Explores the influence of global health.
  
  • NURS 431 - Public/Community Nursing Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 6
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 331 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 434 
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 330 , NURS 332 

    Opportunities for clinical practice as a provider of public/community health nursing care for the individual, family, population, and global community and to function as a member of the interprofessional team when working among diverse and/or vulnerable populations. Emphasis is placed on leadership, management, and providing safe, comprehensive, evidence-based nursing care. The effect of health policy on client care is an integral part of the course.
  
  • NURS 432 - Psychiatric/Mental Health


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 , NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 331 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 433 
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 330 , NURS 332 

    Focuses on the principles, concepts, and best practices that guide nursing practice in a variety of psychiatric/mental health settings. Addresses the role of the nurse in primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention/intervention as it relates to individuals, families, and aggregates with mental health and psychiatric conditions.
  
  • NURS 433 - Psychiatric/Mental Health Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 6
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 , NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 331 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 432 
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 330 , NURS 332 

    Focuses on opportunities to provide mental health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention in a variety of settings and diverse populations. Increases students’ ability to perform as a member of inter-professional teams in acute and community-based psychiatric care facilities and to identify personal beliefs and how they impact the therapeutic relationship. Students assimilate evidence-based practice through critical reasoning to apply nursing strategies to assist individuals, families, and groups.
  
  • NURS 434 - Public/Community Nursing


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 , NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 331 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 431 
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 330 , NURS 332 

    Focuses on public/community health nursing care for the individual, family, population, and global community. Examines the influences of the health care delivery systems and theoretical frameworks applicable to public/community health. Considers the impact of technology, environment, society, and current issues in public/community health nursing.
  
  • NURS 436 - Adult Health II


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 , NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 330 , NURS 331 , NURS 332 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 412 , NURS 437 , NURS 440 ; or permission
    Focuses on the adult and older adult, family, and community with critical and/or complex health problems and with a patient-centered approach to nursing care. Emphasizes the relationships among clinical manifestations of disease states, treatment, cultural influences, and associated nursing responsibilities. Focuses on utilizing students’ knowledge base of diagnostics, pharmacology, interventions, and rehabilitation needs through critical reasoning to plan the care of patients with critical and/or complex health problems. Emphasizes the incorporation of evidence-based practice interventions into nursing practice.
  
  • NURS 437 - Adult Health II Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 7.5
    Credits: 2.5

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 , NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 330 , NURS 331 , NURS 332 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 412 , NURS 436 , NURS 440 ; or permission
    Opportunities for clinical practice as a provider of care for critical and/or complex, acutely ill clients in a variety of settings. Places emphasis on leadership, management, and providing safe, comprehensive, evidence-based nursing care. Utilizes patient care technologies, information systems, and communication devices that support safe, patient-centered nursing care.
  
  • NURS 440 - Nursing Management Clinical


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 7.5
    Credits: 2.5

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 , NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 330 , NURS 331 , NURS 332 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 412 , NURS 436 , NURS 437 ; or permission
    An opportunity for students to incorporate delegation and prioritization skills when caring for multiple patients in an adult health acute care setting. Emphasizes leadership skills and management principles to ensure delivery of high-quality, evidence-based, cost-effective care.
  
  • NURS 450 - A Cognitive Approach to Clinical Problem Solving


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: NURS 312 , NURS 316 ; grades of “C” or better in NURS 330 , NURS 331 , NURS 332 , NURS 333 , NURS 336 , NURS 337 ; or permission
    Corequisite: NURS 431  or NURS 433  or NURS 440  or NURS 437 ; or permission
    Focuses on advanced clinical problem-solving and decision-making skills needed by professional nurses. Factors that influence clinical problem solving are examined to facilitate higher-level thinking in simulated clinical situations.
  
  • NURS 455 - Health Care Informatics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on aspects of acquiring, storing, retrieving, and effectively utilizing health information to support decision making, knowledge, and outcomes. Combines concepts, theory, and practice from the cognitive, computer, and information sciences.
  
  • NURS 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.
  
  • NURS 493 - Internship


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-12

    Prerequisite: NURS 236  or licensed practical nurse or registered nurse; 60cr completed; minimum 2.0 GPA
    A supervised experience in a practice setting that extends and complements course work in nursing. The types of practice settings may include acute care hospitals, outpatient health centers, and community agencies.

Philosophy

  
  • PHIL 100 - Introduction to Philosophy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Acquaints the beginning student with philosophical problems and methods. Possible topics include the existence of God, human freedom, the scope and limits of human knowledge, the nature of mind, the nature of morality, and the relationship between the individual and the state.
  
  • PHIL 101 - Critical Thinking


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An introduction to basic principles of informal logic and critical thinking. An emphasis is on different kinds of arguments, methods of argument evaluation, and the analysis of arguments as they arise in various contexts, such as political debate, advertising, science, law, and ethics.
  
  • PHIL 122 - Contemporary Moral Issues


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines attempts to answer foundational questions of ethics, including the following: Why should we be moral? What do morally correct actions have in common? Are there objective moral standards, or are moral codes relative to individual societies? Does morality require religion? Diverse moral theories are applied to contemporary debates and controversies, such as environmental ethics, abortion, capital punishment, affirmative action, and animal rights. Readings will draw on historical and contemporary figures.
  
  • PHIL 130 - Introduction to Biomedical Ethics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces ethical issues in medicine and health care, such as patient autonomy and surrogate decision making; death, dying, and end of life care; reproductive ethics; justice and allocation of health care resources; global health, poverty, and development; public health ethics; and ethics of emerging medical technologies.
  
  • PHIL 221 - Symbolic Logic I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces students to the study of formal patterns of good reasoning. Topics include symbolizing English sentences in an artificial language, distinguishing between the semantics and syntax of that language, and learning to test for logical properties and relations using semantic methods (truth-tables, models) and syntactic methods (derivations). Students with an interest in computer science and mathematics will find the material of particular interest and use.
  
  • PHIL 223 - Philosophy of Art


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces students to the philosophical investigation of art and aesthetics. Focuses on some of the major problems in the philosophy of art, for example, the definition of art, the nature of works of art, the nature of artistic creativity, the evaluation of works of art, the relationship between art and emotion, and the relationship between aesthetics and ethics.
  
  • PHIL 232 - Philosophies of Love


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines the philosophical foundations of contemporary institutions and ideologies of romantic love. Considers major positions in both the history of philosophy and contemporary philosophy. Investigates the concepts, problems, and philosophical theories central to understanding romantic love, marriage, and divorce (Titled Philosophical Perspectives on Love, Marriage, and Divorce before 2014-15.)
  
  • PHIL 240 - Philosophy and the Good Life


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines philosophical attempts to say what it means to live a good life. Is living a good life simply about maximizing the pleasure one experiences? Does a good life require religious faith? Is being virtuous essential to living a good life? Historical thinkers considered may include Plato, Aristotle, Confucius, Laozi, Augustine, Aquinas, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and Russell. Contemporary philosophical work on happiness informed by empirical research may also be considered.
  
  • PHIL 270 - Ethics and the Environment


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Applies ethical theory to environmental issues, including resource depletion, animal rights, biotic endangerment, environmental degradation, climate change, and environmental justice. Considers arguments by which human-caused environmental destruction is intrinsically wrong, wrong independently of human interests and purposes, and arguments for environmental policies by which the following are granted rights, interests, or inherent value: non-human animals, all living things, all natural things, biotic communities, and ecosystems. Also considers arguments that environmental policies cannot be applied globally without injustice to humans, including poor and indigenous peoples.
  
  • PHIL 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • PHIL 320 - Ethical Theory


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines historical and contemporary work on fundamental issues in ethical theory, with an emphasis on the three major approaches in normative ethics: consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. Also explores select topics in contemporary metaethics, such as the meaning of moral discourse, the possibility of moral knowledge, and the nature of reasons and moral motivation.
  
  • PHIL 323 - Political Philosophy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Through an examination of Ancient, Modern, and contemporary political thought, introduces the key issues of political philosophy: the justification of government authority, the role of the government in the just distribution of wealth in society, the nature of equality, the nature and importance of individual liberty and rights, the connections between race, gender, and political power, and the question of the universal applicability of concepts fundamental to European and American political philosophy in light of increasing globalization.
  
  • PHIL 324 - Ancient Greek Philosophy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the foundations of Western philosophy through examination of important philosophers of the Ancient period, such as the Pre-Socratic philosophers, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Topics may include the nature of the physical universe, Plato’s theory of Forms, the nature of happiness, and the possibility of morality. (Titled Ancient Philosophy before 2014-15.)
  
  • PHIL 325 - Early Modern European Philosophy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A study of exemplary philosophical texts from the late 16th through the late 18th century. Figures may include Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Spinoza, Berkeley, Leibniz, Hume, and Kant. Explores such topics as the nature of matter and mind, the possibility and limits of knowledge, and the emerging scientific challenge to church and ancient authority. (Titled Modern Philosophy before 2014-15.)
  
  • PHIL 326 - Existentialism


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines existentialism as a philosophical movement, one that rejects both traditional religious and overly reductive, scientific conceptions of human existence. As an alternative, existentialist philosophers share the project of trying to articulate a conception of an authentic, meaningful life outside of the parameters of these approaches. Readings are drawn from major thinkers in this movement, including Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Albert Camus. (Titled Phenomenology and Existentialism before 2014-15.)
  
  • PHIL 330 - Philosophy of Science


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Philosophical investigation into the character of empirical scientific thought and practices: measures of confirmation; empirical success; theory ladenness of observation; scientific rationality and the aims of science; the inference from empirical success to truth; the logic of explanation; the character of natural laws; levels of theorizing and intertheoretic reduction; the ideal of objectivity and the place of extra-scientific values in theory appraisal. No special background required.
  
  • PHIL 350 - The Human Experience of Time


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines philosophical questions about the nature and experience of time. Explores how philosophical views about time are informed by work in different fields, such as anthropology, religious studies, and physics. Questions include whether time is real or an illusion, whether it flows, whether the past, present, and future are equally real, whether time travel is possible, how different cultures think about time and what light that sheds on its true nature. Readings drawn from a wide range of historical and contemporary sources.
  
  • PHIL 360 - Philosophy of Mind


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on the mind-body problem. Topics covered may include dualism, logical behaviorism, identity theories, functionalism, various forms of physicalism, mental causation, reductionism, and consciousness.
  
  • PHIL 390 - Philosophy of Human Nature


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines philosophical theories of human nature, including how traditional philosophical debates about the mind, morality, persons, and freedom are informed by recent empirical work in the cognitive sciences. Topics covered may include philosophical and scientific debates about the innate content and structure of the human mind, moral judgment, the possibility of free will, the extent to which human beings are rational, and the nature of the self and self-knowledge. Connections between conceptions of human nature and political philosophy, as well as bioethical issues concerning enhancement and transhumanism, may also be discussed.
  
  • PHIL 420 - Metaphysics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the nature of reality through investigation of such concepts as substance, cause, freedom, and God. Draws on both historical and contemporary writings. Other topics may include the nature of space and time, the role of language in comprehending reality, the possibility of nonsensory knowledge, and the nature of possibility and necessity.
  
  • PHIL 421 - Theory of Knowledge


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines various views concerning the nature of knowledge, belief, and justification. Readings drawn from a wide range of historical and contemporary authors. Additional topics may include perceptual knowledge, common sense, skepticism, and the relation between a knower and the community.
  
  • PHIL 450 - Philosophy of Law


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An examination of central issues in the philosophy of law, including law and morality, the interpretation of law, and philosophical and legal issues concerning punishment, justice, rights, and liberty. Combines philosophical theory with consideration of selected court cases to develop an understanding of law and its place in society.
  
  • PHIL 460 - Philosophy of Language


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An investigation of issues in the philosophy of language and related issues in linguistics (including anthropological linguistics, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics). Topics include, for example, the influence of language on perception, rationalist/empiricist perspectives on language acquisition, language and political control, reference, meaning, and truth.
  
  • PHIL 481 - Special Topics l


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students.
  
  • PHIL 483 - Honors Thesis


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite: Admission to departmental honors program; prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    An intensive, focused study involving independent research culminating in a written thesis approved by a thesis director and two faculty readers/committee members. Repeatable: May be taken more than once to a maximum of 6cr.
  
  • PHIL 493 - Internship in Philosophy


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite: Permission of the department, junior or senior philosophy major or double major, 2.5 GPA
    A supervised experience of no longer than one semester and no less than five weeks. This would take place in either a public or private organization in areas that either extend and develop or complement course work in philosophy. Log and/or major paper required. Internships are to be done with a clear analysis, argumentation, and examination of governing principles.

Physics

  
  • PHYS 100 - Prelude to Physics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Students who have earned a “C” or better in a higher number physics course may not take this course.
    Prepares students for their first course in quantitative physics by reviewing fundamental concepts involving measurement and error, graphing, motion, and applications of Newton’s Laws in developing problem-solving skills. Also presents a historical perspective as well as introduces the many opportunities that exist for those with a background in physics.
  
  • PHYS 101 - Energy and Our Environment


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines the areas of energy, transportation, and pollution using the relevant concepts of physical science and physics. This is a non-laboratory course for Liberal Studies requirements.
  
  • PHYS 105 - The Physics of Light and Sound


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    The study of light and sound as applied in the production of objects of art and the production of music. Includes the study of vision, light in nature, photography, and artistic media and the study of hearing, musical sound, musical instruments, and room acoustics. A non-laboratory course for Liberal Studies requirements.
  
  • PHYS 111 - Physics I Lecture


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MATH 105  or appropriate mathematics placement test score
    Explores matter and energy. Uses algebra and trigonometry to examine the foundational principles of physics. Examines linear and rotational motion, energy, work, and momentum. Application of Newton’s laws of motion is a critical component of this course. Investigates oscillations, waves, fluids, and heat.
  
  • PHYS 112 - Physics II Lecture


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PHYS 111 
    Electricity and magnetism, heat, light, atomic and nuclear physics, and an elementary introduction to relativity and quantum theory.
  
  • PHYS 121 - Physics I Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 111 

    Physics laboratory at level of Physics I; exercises in mechanics, wave motion, and sound.
  
  • PHYS 122 - Physics II Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 112 

    Physics laboratory at level of Physics II; exercises in optics, electricity and magnetism, and radioactivity.
  
  • PHYS 131 - Physics I-C Lecture


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MATH 121  or MATH 125 , at least concurrently
    A calculus-based course in general college physics; topics covered are similar to those covered in PHYS 111  but are treated in more depth through the use of calculus.
  
  • PHYS 132 - Physics II-C Lecture


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MATH 122  or MATH 126 , at least concurrently
    A calculus-based course in general college physics utilizing the techniques in problem solving learned in PHYS 131  applied to more advanced topics; topics covered are: electric fields, magnetic fields, Coulomb’s Law, Gauss’Law, Ampere’s Law, circuits, geometric optics, and physical optics.
  
  • PHYS 141 - Physics I-C Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 131 

    Physics laboratory at same level as Physics I-C; exercises in mechanics, wave motion, and sound.
  
  • PHYS 142 - Physics II-C Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 132  at least concurrently

    Physics laboratory at same level as Physics II; exercises in optics, mechanics, wave motion, and sound.
  
  • PHYS 151 - Medical Physics Lecture


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Development of concepts and principles of physics with a strong emphasis as to their use and application in medical and other biophysical areas.
  
  • PHYS 161 - Medical Physics Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Corequisite: PHYS 151 
    Experiments dealing with applications of physical principles to the field of medicine. Practical experience with use of electronic equipment, chart recorders, etc., of type found in modern-day medicine are introduced.
  
  • PHYS 222 - Mechanics I


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 ; MATH 122  or MATH 126  
    Covers the basic laws and concepts of the mechanical universe. The dynamics of a particle in one, two, and three dimensions are covered. Central forces, including planetary and satellite motion, are discussed and analyzed in detail using Newton’s gravitational law. Other topics covered are statics, multiple particle system dynamics, mechanical energy, and oscillations.
  
  • PHYS 223 - Mechanics II


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: MATH 341 , PHYS 222 
    Mechanics of a rigid body, constraints, oscillations, wave motion, introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian  formulation and relativistic mechanics
  
  • PHYS 231 - Electronics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: MATH 122  or MATH 126 ; PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 
    Circuit theory, transients, transistor circuits, frequency response, input and output impedance, feedback, and electronic noise. Operational amplifiers and digital electronics.
  
  • PHYS 260 - Introduction to Nanoscience and Technology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 
    An introduction to the theoretical and experimental concepts of the emerging field of nanotechnology. Prepares students from a wide range of disciplines for careers or higher studies in areas involving nanotechnology. Inherently interdisciplinary in nature, bridges across physics, chemistry, biology, and computer science. Covers the emerging role of nanostructure materials for current and future applications in the fields of electronics, energy, textiles, and medicine.
  
  • PHYS 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • PHYS 321 - Introduction to Computational Physics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces a basic understanding of the methods and tools of computational physics, allowing their use in solving various physics, engineering, and science problems. Emphasizes mastery of software, using it to solve physical problems, and hands-on learning through some trial and error.
  
  • PHYS 331 - Modern Physics I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 ; MATH 122  or MATH 126  
    Covers the history of modern physics. Explores particle and wave properties of matter using the ideas of quantum mechanics. Examines systems using the ideas of quantum and classical mechanics. Covers the special theory of relativity. Solves some of the problems using computers. First part of a two-part series.
  
  • PHYS 332 - Modern Physics II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PHYS 331  

     
    Continuation of PHYS 331 . Discusses more topics such as quantum mechanics in three dimensions, the hydrogen atom, spin as it applies to quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, nuclear physics, and fundamental particles. Solves some of the problems using computers.

  
  • PHYS 342 - Thermal and Statistical Physics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MATH 122  or MATH 126 ; PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 
    Thermometry, laws of thermodynamics, low-temperature physics, entropy, properties of ideal gas, and an introduction to statistical mechanics.
  
  • PHYS 345 - Optics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MATH 122  or MATH 126 ; PHYS 112  or PHYS 132 
    Geometrical optics and physical optics, including interference, diffraction, and polarization. Quantum optics is introduced.
  
  • PHYS 350 - Intermediate Experimental Physics I


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 6
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PHYS 331 PHYS 342  
    Performs required fundamental experiments in areas of mechanics, optics, modern physics, and heat. Speaking before other classmates and faculty and competence in writing scientific papers and reports are emphasized. Effectiveness in the collection of data is important. Computers will often be utilized to perform data taking and analysis.
  
  • PHYS 355 - Computer Interfacing


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COSC 110 
    Teaches the fundamentals of interfacing the personal computer to its physical surroundings. Teaches how to collect data and to control experiments in real time. Shows how to use digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) techniques and analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) techniques. A graphical software package (such as LabVIEW) is also used to design icon-based interfacing tools, to learn how to use virtual instruments, and to analyze data.
 

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