Jun 14, 2024  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Credit designation at right of title is expressed in (c) class hours per week, (l) lab or (d) discussion section hours per week, and (cr) number of credits per semester.

 

French

  
  • FRNC 230 - Intermediate French Composition and Grammar


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FRNC 220  or equivalent; may be taken concurrently
    Intensive practice in written expression and communication in French together with a grammar review. Intermediate-level language course with the goal of fostering writing in French for a variety of practical purposes. Review and expansion of specific grammar points are integrated into each unit. Taught in French.
  
  • FRNC 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Lab/Discussion: 1
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • FRNC 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times.
  
  • FRNC 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member. An opportunity to engage in an in-depth analysis of some topic dealing with the French language and culture through consultation with a faculty member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.

Fashion Merchandising

  
  • FSMR 112 - Fundamentals of Clothing Construction


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Principles and techniques involved in fundamental clothing construction and fitting are analyzed. Directed laboratory experiences provide an opportunity to solve individual problems in garment structure through the application of principles.
  
  • FSMR 125 - Cultural Studies of Dress and Appearance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines contemporary, traditional, and ethnic dress and appearance practices. Incorporates the application of cultural theory to appearance as well as how social and psychological forces shape conceptions of beauty and appropriateness in clothing, appearance, and fashion.
  
  • FSMR 158 - Fashion Show Production


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on developing a practical understanding of fashion through image, language, and events. All aspects of production and management of fashion shows are addressed, including the importance of teamwork. (Offered as FSMR 358 before 2016-17.)
  
  • FSMR 180 - Introduction to Fashion


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A survey of fashion careers and industry functions including design, production, retail channels, and current trends.
  
  • FSMR 195 - Computer Aided Design for Fashion Professionals


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the functions and tools of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop in the creation of technical fashion drawings, manipulated photographs, trend boards, and textile patterns.

  
  • FSMR 212 - Advanced Clothing Construction


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 112  or placement (by exam)
    Principles of advanced fitting and clothing construction are applied and analyzed. Offered even years, fall semester.
  
  • FSMR 215 - Textiles


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
    An interpretation of basic textile knowledge with emphasis on fiber, yarn, fabric structure, coloration, and fabric finishes. Discussions include importance of factors related to consumer information, protection, and satisfaction. (Offered as FSMR 314 before 2016-17.)
  
  • FSMR 252 - Fashion Design and Styling


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    The study of contemporary apparel design and the relationship of design elements and principles to personal characteristics and social/professional orientation.
  
  • FSMR 258 - Fashion Brand Merchandising


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on contemporary concepts, phrases, branding terms, and theoretical frameworks for most fashion brand-relative activities. Applies concepts about the role of branding in fashion through projects, such as case studies, exercises, shadowing activities, and developing their own fashion brand.
  
  • FSMR 262 - Fashion Forecasting


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 180 
    A study and an analysis of the global fashion society and the trends that emerge. Evolving styles, changes in buying habits, and economic conditions are assessed to predict fashion consumer behavior. An emphasis on the interrelationships among apparel industry segments and the application of fashion theories to the forecasting process.
  
  • FSMR 280 - Introduction to Apparel Buying


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 180  with a grade of “C” or better and MATH 217 
    Focuses on using basic mathematical concepts, principles, and terminology critical in understanding fundamental merchandising applications needed for profitable apparel buying.
  
  • FSMR 281 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.
  
  • FSMR 290 - Advanced Principles in Apparel Buying


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 280 
    Focuses on advanced mathematical concepts in merchandising applications used for apparel buying. Addresses the developing and determining unit and dollar assortment plans, cost of merchandise, profitability, inventory control, and retail sale prices.
  
  • FSMR 303 - Visual Merchandising


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing
    Students design and arrange display and selling areas in relationship to merchandising trends and consumer demands. Emphasizes promotion techniques and merchandise sales through effective use of space, design, and color.
  
  • FSMR 356 - Historic Textiles


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A study of the development of textiles from ancient times to present day with special emphasis on techniques used in constructing historic textiles
  
  • FSMR 357 - Global Fashion Sourcing and Trade


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Studies the global textiles and apparel industry with an emphasis on the U.S. textile complex and the U.S. market within an international context.
  
  • FSMR 359 - E-Commerce for Fashion


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 258 
    Explores aspects of building an Internet business and learn a business process to start a new business that focuses specifically on the Internet shopping mall. Design an Internet marketing plan to create an Internet business in the Fashion Industry
  
  • FSMR 380 - Applications in Apparel Buying


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 280  (FSMR 290  recommended)
    Focuses on the development of a six-month stock and sales plan for a retail business using computer applications. Includes retail sales projections, controlling inventory, calculating the amount of merchandise to purchase, determining markup percentages, and effectively using markdowns to manage inventory.
  
  • FSMR 385 - Ready-to-Wear Analysis


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 112 
    An examination and evaluation of the quality of ready-to-wear apparel through construction, style, fit, marketability, and price.
  
  • FSMR 433 - Study Tour


    Class Hours: var
    Lab/Discussion: 1
    Credits: 6

    Prerequisite: Upper-level standing
    Opportunity is provided to visit business establishments and cultural centers concerned with household equipment, furnishings, textiles, clothing, and housing in America as well as abroad. Museums, factories, designers’ showrooms, distribution centers, stores, cultural events, and seminars  are included. Course may be repeated for a total of 6cr.
  
  • FSMR 434 - Quality Analysis


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 112  and FSMR 215  
    Examines and evaluates the quality of sewn products through fabric, construction, and end-use. Industry specifications and textile testing will be emphasized.
  
  • FSMR 453 - Flat Pattern Design


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 112  or FSMR 212 
    Garment design achieved by use of flat pattern techniques.  An understanding is developed of the interrelationship of  garment design, figure analysis, fabric, fit, and construction processes. Offered even years, spring  semester.
  
  • FSMR 455 - Draping


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FSMR 112  or FSMR 212 
    Apparel design principles are applied by draping fabric to conform to the human figure. Students will pad a form to individual measurements and create garments that are both individual and original.
  
  • FSMR 456 - Historic Costume


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing
    A chronological study of historic costume from ancient times to the present day with emphasis on the effect of aesthetic, economic, geographic, political, religious, and social factors on the design of clothing worn.
  
  • FSMR 480 - Fashion Portfolio


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Senior standing
    Focuses on the ability to visually and professionally communicate and present student competencies in a variety of formats suitable for job-seeking purposes. Addresses both electronic and traditional format resume and portfolio presentations.
  
  • FSMR 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students.
  
  • FSMR 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    Particular consumer considerations are independently investigated in the areas of housing, home equipment, interior design, clothing, and textiles, or in the management of resources. Students meet with a faculty member at least five hours per credit. Repeatable: May be repeated for a total of 3cr.
  
  • FSMR 493 - Internship


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-12

    Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and department chairperson; upper-level standing
    A practical experience related to the student’s major area of study with objectives, supervised experience, and evaluation. Repeatable: May be repeated for a total of 12cr. (Offered as CNSV 493 before 2016-17.)

Geography

  
  • GEOG 101 - Environment and Society


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    The physical environment is modified by human activities, largely as a consequence of the ways in which societies value and use earth’s natural resources, but human activities and distributions are, in turn, influenced by earth’s physical features and processes. These themes are addressed by examining the geography of environmental impacts such as tropical deforestation, global climate change, energy development, urban growth, and agricultural land use. Also considered are natural hazards such as hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and flooding.
  
  • GEOG 102 - Geography of the United States and Canada


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A conceptually based introductory-level geography course that focuses on the American landscape. Includes mapping culture regions; tracing settlement patterns; resource use; environmental perceptions; the interplay of urbanization, industrialization, postindustrialization, and spatial mobility; the occurrence of economically disadvantaged landscapes; and the role individuals and society have in the creation of the geographic landscape.
  
  • GEOG 104 - World Geography: Global Context


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Relates theories of the discipline of geography to current world issues and global patterns. Emphasizes local versus global strategies of resource management, spatial legacies of colonialism, contemporary multiscale issues with workforce migration, urban structure, disease, and globalization. Focuses on global patterns of development through comparative approaches and understanding of human and physical geographic characteristics of world regions.
  
  • GEOG 105 - Our Digital Earth: Mobile Devices, Web Applications, and Geospatial Technology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An overview of evolving geographically-enabled (geospatial) technologies and applications, and explores the wide-ranging impacts of geospatial technology on human decision-making, perceptions, and society. Covers location-based services, including personal navigation, global positioning systems (GPS), web-based mapping services, and social networks with real-time location information commonly found on personal mobile devices such as phones, tablets, and personal computers. Explores the technologies and societal implications of our digital planet with particular focus on the geospatial technologies that make geographically-enabled mobile and web applications possible.
  
  • GEOG 109 - Geographic Information Science and Systems for Energy Applications


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Provides students with knowledge of the theoretical basis of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and geospatial technologies and their application for the energy sectors. Covers the specifics of selected GIS and database software packages. Develops skills to conceptualize energy-related GIS applications, use GIS software packages, manipulate and query geographic data to solve problems, perform simple spatial analysis, and understand how to utilize GIS for energy-related analyses.
  
  • GEOG 213 - Cartography and Map Design


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces principles of thematic map construction. Emphasizes techniques of choropleth mapping and the production of scientific graphs and charts. (Also offered as RGPL 213 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 222 - Geography of National Parks


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Analyzes the spatial characteristics of America’s National Park System. Examines the national parks idea with respect to wilderness conservation, preservation, and public presentation of natural and historic sites and landscapes; investigates the physical geography of national parks as defined by ecoregions (physiography, climate, natural vegetation); and evaluates landscape designs within the National Parks System relative to dominant planning techniques of the past and present.
  
  • GEOG 230 - Cultural Geography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces cultural geography, including folk and popular culture, religion, language, ethnicity and race, population, agriculture, urban and political geography, human relationships with the natural environment, culture regions, cultural diffusion, cultural interaction, globalization, and cultural landscapes.
  
  • GEOG 231 - Economic Geography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An introduction to geographic concepts, methods, and skills related to spatial patterns of production, consumption, and exchange over the earth’s surface. Emphasizes a global perspective using a combination of theoretical and empirical concepts.
  
  • GEOG 232 - Urban Landscapes


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces basic concepts of urban morphology and landscapes including site, situation, function, urban land use, urban structure, and urban hierarchy. Explores relationships between urban structure and urban planning. (Also offered as RGPL 232 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 251 - Geography of Pennsylvania


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Regions of Pennsylvania are examined in detail to identify man-environment relationships. Soils, topography, climate, vegetation, population, and economic patterns are studied.
  
  • GEOG 252 - Geography of Latin America


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Provides a critical and empirical analysis of the region of the world known as Latin America. Reviews the region’s development and underdevelopment from geographic, historic, and economic perspectives. Offers a survey of the physical geography of Central America, South America, and the Caribbean and describes the human geography of settlements, agriculture, and the built environment in response to the physical characteristics of the region. Includes natural resources, indigenous cultures, colonial legacy, climate
    conditions, political differences, and globalization.
  
  • GEOG 253 - Geography of Europe


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A critical analysis and understanding of historic factors that led to the creation of the European Union. Critically examines current and future economic and political challenges that face the European Union. A survey of the human geography and physical resources of contemporary Europe in historical and global context. Covers a broad range of topics, including Europe, in historic perspective, physical geography, human-environment interactions, population dynamics, culture and change, economic and agricultural development, urbanization and migration, and political geography.
  
  • GEOG 254 - Geography of Russia, Central Eurasia, and Eastern Europe


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 01
    Credits: 3

    Examines the Russian Federation, former Soviet satellites, and the European and Asiatic successor states. The region is the realm of Eurasian languages, historical schisms between eastern and western Europe, and the geographical legacies of the Tsarist and Soviet empires. Topics include terrain and environment, population, economic regions, resources, and geopolitics. These are studied in the context of environmental location and position between Eastern and Western power centers of the 21st century.
  
  • GEOG 255 - Geography of Africa


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A critical geographic analysis and understanding of Africa, and the continent’s level of development against the background of traditional misconceptions about the region. Offers a survey of the human geography and physical resources of contemporary Africa in a historical and global context. Covers a broad range of topics, including Africa, in historical perspective, physical geography, human-environment interactions, population dynamics, culture and change, economic and agricultural development, urbanization and migration, and political geography.
  
  • GEOG 256 - Geography of East and Southeast Asia


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A critical geographic analysis and understanding of East and Southeast Asia including its natural environment, human landscapes, and historical geography, and how these aspects of place interact with each other in space. Examines East and Southeast Asia at multiple scales by providing a comprehensive analysis of spatial patterns within the region, across the region as a whole, and by considering how East and Southeast Asia interface with a globalizing planet. Explains the political and economic evolution of this region from the period of global colonialism, through the rise and fall of Marxist ideology to its current position as the emergent Asian Pacific Rim. Covers a broad range of topics, including: historical geography; physical geography; human-environment interactions; population dynamics; cultural geography; economic and agricultural development; urbanization and migration; and political geography. (Titled Geography of East Asia before 2014-15.)
  
  • GEOG 257 - Geography of South and Southwest Asia


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 01
    Credits: 3

    A geographical exploration and analysis of South and Southwest Asia. A survey overview of the complex physical and human geographies of the region, including demographic transition, gender inequalities, issues of development in the postcolonial global era, religious diversity, the Israeli- Palestinian conflict, US foreign policy toward the region, the exploitation of resources (particularly oil), terrorism, and the rise of radical Islamist movements. (Titled Geography of South and Southeast Asia before to 2014-15.)
  
  • GEOG 261 - Geography of Wine


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    The geography of the grape, its production, products, social significance, and consequences of the global wine trade are explored. Students develop an appreciation for the environmental constraints and characteristics of wines and wine regions. Field trips to visit wineries are an essential element. Verifiable proof of 21 years of age required for voluntary wine-tasting activities.
  
  • GEOG 314 - Map and Photograph Interpretation


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Maps and air photographs, along with remote sensing materials, permit inventory, and analysis of geologic, land use, urban development, and other landscape phenomena. The understanding of these materials and associated tools for their use is presented. (Also offered as RGPL 314 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 316 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Presents automated methods for creating, maintaining, and analyzing spatial data. Includes (1) specialized GIS hardware and software; (2) vector vs. raster vs. object-oriented spatial data structures; (3) creation and manipulation of geographic data files; (4) database design and management concepts; (5) spatial analysis; and (6) cartographic design. (Also offered as RGPL 316 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 331 - Population Geography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Spatial variations in numbers, characteristics, and dynamics of human population, models, and theoretical constructs relevant to demographic structures and processes are studied, as well as major world and regional problems.
  
  • GEOG 333 - Trade and Transportation


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Deals with the spatial aspects of transportation systems and their use. Discusses circulation, accessibility, time and distance concepts, and trade patterns. (Also offered as RGPL 333 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 334 - Political Geography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Geographic factors and conditions are analyzed as they relate to the character and function of states. Political institutions are evaluated in light of geographic conditions.
  
  • GEOG 336 - Social Geography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines spatial dimensions of American society emphasizing the patterns and places that result from the human use of space. Explains how social theory has influenced the discipline of geography with respects to understanding space from a positivist, humanist, and structuralist perspective, and how this has changed with the shift from modern to postmodern interpretations of place. This understanding of social theory is the base for using positivist techniques involving census statistics and mapping procedures to analyze spatial patterns associated with social landscapes including, race, ethnicity, socio- economic status, migration and neighborhood change. Social theory also underpins class discussions and exercises exploring human spatial behavior, environmental perception, and place identity.
  
  • GEOG 337 - Historical Geography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Includes studies of past geographies, geographical change through time, and historical perspectives on the cultural landscape. Emphasizes historical geography of the United States.
  
  • GEOG 341 - Climatology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines the elements of weather and climate on earth. The location and causes of global climatic regions are examined in relation to moving pressure and wind systems. Also considers the climatic history of the planet and recent human modifications of the atmospheric environment. (Also offered as RGPL 341 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 342 - Physiography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on landform types and their spatial distribution. Emphasizes the tectonic forces that build landforms and the weathering and erosional processes that erode and shape surface features. The relationship between human activities and landforms is also considered. (Also offered as RGPL 342 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 343 - Fresh Water Resources


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on surface and groundwater as a resource with unique properties. Fresh water is defined physically by storage in the hydrologic cycle and the values assigned by different cultures. Problems featured relate to consumptive and withdrawal water uses, the problems of water supply and scarcity, water law and its inconsistencies, flooding and floodplain management, sources of contamination and pollution, wetlands, and case studies of selected river basins. (Also offered as RGPL 343 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 345 - Biogeography for Environmental Managers


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One course from GEOG 341 , GEOG 342 , BIOL 103 , BIOL 115 
    Examines the distribution of plants and animals across the earth’s surface, as influenced by natural and human processes. Emphasizes landscape and regional habitat dynamics as they relate to environmental planning and management. Field trips supplement lectures and readings. (Also offered as RGPL 345 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 404 - Transportation Planning


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 333 /RGPL 333  or RGPL 350  or one course from the Economic Geographer Concentration
    Introduces the major themes and methods of transportation planning, particularly in an urban context. It is project oriented and supported by readings from the scholarly literature covering themes such as modes of transit, land use implications, and commercial development. Reading assignments are organized topically and coordinated with two workbook projects that develop applied skills. Topics include theory, empirical description, and methodological practice. (Also offered as RGPL 404 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 409 - Spatial Analysis Applications in the Energy Sectors Workshop


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 109 
    Characterizes the spatial representation and analysis techniques used by public, private, and nonprofit entities engaged in the energy industries. Focuses in particular on the implementation of energy resource applications including exploration and development, environmental and cultural compliance, logistics, production analysis, and infrastructure maintenance.
  
  • GEOG 411 - History of Geography


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 230  and at least 9 other GEOG credits
    Deals with history of the discipline, great ideas, major scholars, leading problems, and unresolved issues.
  
  • GEOG 415 - Introduction to Remote Sensing


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces concepts, principles, methods, and theories applied in and through remote sensing of the earth’s physical and cultural features. Includes understanding the physical principles of the electromagnetic spectrum, the technological underpinnings of a variety of sensors, and applications of these technologies. Applies industry standard software packages in the geospatial sciences to illustrate course concepts and build software recognition and application skills. (Also, offered as RGPL 415 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 419 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Environmental Applications


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 60 completed credits or instructor permission
    Provides knowledge of the theoretical basis of geographic information systems (GIS) and its applications for environmental scientific analysis. In the process of demonstrating some of the capabilities of GIS, the specifics of selected GIS and database software packages will also be covered. Students develop the skills to use GIS packages, manipulate and query geographic data to solve problems, perform simple spatial analysis, and understand how to utilize GIS for environmental analysis and resource management.
  
  • GEOG 421 - Enterprise GIS Management


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 424  or instructor permission
    Principles and methods for creating, operating, maintaining, and managing data for multiuser geospatial information systems are studied. Each student will customize, document, and operate a multiuser geographic information system of his or her design. (Also offered as RGPL 421; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 424 - Technical Issues in Geographic Information Systems


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 316  or GEOG 419  
    Uses project-based approach to develop and maintain a geographic information system (GIS). Designs and implements functional systems through cooperative learning. Covers methods for designing GIS to user specification, data collection, data input, project management, and system documentation. (Also offered as RGPL 424 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 425 - Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Concepts and Techniques


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 60cr completed or instructor permission
    Provides knowledge of the theoretical basis and practical applications of global positioning systems (GPS). Students gain hands-on experience using GPS receivers and GPS observables, as well as the ability to determine point and relative position fixes from pseudorange and carrier phase measurements. Students are exposed to industry-standard GPS hardware and software, as well as appropriate techniques for processing GPS data to achieve necessary levels of horizontal and vertical positional accuracy. Integration of GPS and geographic information systems (GIS) will also be discussed.
  
  • GEOG 427 - GeoDesign


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 424  or RGPL 424  
    Provides an introduction and application of the theory and techniques of the GeoDesign framework. Involves data-driven decision making for collaborative community development and land-use planning and is an emerging conceptual framework for place-based decisions and designs. Integrates knowledge of community planning, decision making, landscape design, and Geospatial techniques to produce a professional quality project. (Also offered as RGPL 427 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 435 - Geography of Energy


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Covers patterns and problems of energy production and consumption in human societies. Descriptions of what, where, and how much are combined with issues such as technological change, conservation, allocation, environmental impacts, and economic development. Specific topics include global history and trends of energy development, pricing systems, types of energy, locations of production areas, and the energy status of the United States.
  
  • GEOG 440 - Conservation: Environmental Analysis


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Problems of exploitation and utilization of regional resources such as soils, minerals, forests, and wildlife are considered in relation to population growth and regional planning and development. (Also offered as RGPL 440 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 444 - Energy Development and Compliance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 435  or instructor permission
    Reviews and characterizes energy resources found in northern Appalachia and the logic and techniques used to identify, quantify, and regulate their development and extraction. Focuses in particular on the spatial dimensions of shale gas, coal, and wind as major energy sources in northern Appalachia and deals with topics such as exploration, environmental and cultural compliance, logistics, production analysis, and infrastructure maintenance.
  
  • GEOG 454 - GIS Analysis of Public Health


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 316 /RGPL 316  or GEOG 417
    Employs GIS-based public health analysis methods that are employed to understand the distribution and nature of public health problems, health disparities and access to health care services, and potential location-based strategies or interventions. Demonstrates knowledge of cartographic and spatial analyses and how they are used in the field of Public Health. Explores typical spatial public health analysis techniques, as well as demonstrates the ability to select appropriate data and analytical methods to implement GIS-based analyses.
  
  • GEOG 455 - Advanced Remote Sensing


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 415 /RGPL 415  
    Expands beyond basic principles of remote sensing to understand and apply complex methods of data collection, normalization, and analysis. May cover radiometric normalization, spectral transformations, change detection, object oriented classification, spatial analysis and filtering, accuracy assessment, and application of learned techniques. A research intensive experience with a project and paper demonstrating acquired knowledge and application of techniques to a variety of physical and human processes. (Also offered as RGPL 455 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit).
  
  • GEOG 460 - Foundations of Unmanned Aerial Systems Science and Applications


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces fundamental aspects of unmanned aerial systems (UAS), including relevant federal, state and local regulations. Covers UAS functionality, including components, technology and operational issues. Examines scientific technological principles underlying UAS flight and data acquisition. Covers UAS component evaluation and assembly, pre-flight procedures, flight mission planning, and execution of basic flight skills.
  
  • GEOG 462 - Planning Policy, Implementation, and Administration


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: RGPL 350 
    Focuses on the planning and implementation of policies to manage the location, timing, type, and intensity of land development. Explores the multi-step process from community plan to project completion. Exposes students to the public environment in which community plans are developed and implemented and walks them through the real-world problems of identifying projects, building agency and interagency consensus, finding funding, putting together a project plan, project management, personnel, and budget to project completion. (Also offered as RGPL 462 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 463 - Unmanned Aerial Systems for Remote Sensing and Spatial Data Acquisition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 460 
    Examines concepts and techniques involved in the implementation of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for the collection of remote sensing and spatial data acquisition. Emphasizes acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to undertake manual and automated UAS flights for spatial data acquisition, such as: fundamental photogrammetry concepts, UAS mission planning, GPS/GNSS ground control, UAS airborne navigation, and processing of UAS-collected data into data deliverables.
  
  • GEOG 475 - Spatial Analysis Techniques


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 01
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 316  or GEOG 419 
    Presents concepts underlying spatial analysis techniques and provides hands-on experience operationalizing spatial analysis methods through use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) hardware and software.
  
  • GEOG 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students. (May also be offered as RGPL 481; may not be taken for duplicate credit under same title.)
  
  • GEOG 484 - Field Studies in Geography and Social Studies


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Instructor permission
    Immerses the student in a regional environment. Helps the student to see critically and to interpret a cultural landscape. The experience is predominantly off campus. Using a combination of structured field exercises, culturally specific readings, primary and secondary data, and standard geographic field techniques, the course strives to develop a deeper affective and cognitive understanding of a cultural region. Repeatable: May be repeated under a different study area title.
  
  • GEOG 485 - GIS Application Development


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 316 /RGPL 316  
    Designed to provide students with exposure to current industry-standard techniques for developing customized geographic information systems applications to accomplish mapping, analysis and geoprocessing functions. Covers GIS modeling, object-oriented programming, GIS software development, and customization of “out-of-the-box” GIS software to meet user functionality and interface specifications.
  
  • GEOG 488 - Geospatial Intelligence Capstone


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 213  or RGPL 213 , GEOG 316  or RGPL 316 GEOG 415  or RGPL 415 , and MLSC 204  or PLSC 465  
    Synthesizes concepts, skills, and techniques learned in prerequisite courses in the Geospatial Intelligence certifi cate curriculum to develop an applied geo intelligence project. Includes spatial data acquisition, processing, analysis
    and reporting to geospatial intelligence tradecraft standards, as well as a culminating presentation of the project.
  
  • GEOG 493 - Internship


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3-12

    Professional learning experience with emphasis on application of academic background. Open to majors and minors in geography with a total of 60cr and 15cr in the major. See internship supervisor for additional information.
  
  • GEOG 498 - Research Seminar


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEOG 411  
    This senior seminar and workshop constitute a capstone course that focuses on recent research in the major field. Students carry out an applied research project on a topic of local or regional importance. (Also offered as RGPL 498 ; may not be taken for duplicate credit.)
  
  • GEOG 499 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3-6

    Independent research and study under faculty direction. Interested students should approach department chairperson for information.

Geoscience

  
  • GEOS 101 - The Dynamic Earth


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: No geoscience majors/minors
    Examines the constant changes that affect the rocky surface of our planet. From volcanic eruptions and catastrophic earthquakes to the slow drift of continents and passage of ice ages, earth processes have shaped the history of life and altered the development of human civilization. 
  
  • GEOS 102 - The Dynamic Earth Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: No geoscience majors/minors
    Corequisite: Enrollment in GEOS 102 requires corequisite or previous enrollment in GEOS 101  
    Introduces the techniques geologists use to study the earth and reconstruct its past. Labs cover minerals, rocks, map interpretation, and fossil identification and may include field trips during the scheduled lab period.
  
  • GEOS 103 - Oceans and Atmospheres


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: No geoscience majors/minors
    The earth’s oceans and atmosphere play a crucial role in determining the pace and extent of changes occurring to our global environment. Examines the composition and character of these components and their interaction with other major components of the earth system.
  
  • GEOS 104 - Oceans and Atmospheres Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: No geoscience majors/minors
    Corequisite: Enrollment in GEOS 104 requires corequisite or previous enrollment in GEOS 103 
    Introduces the techniques oceanographers and meteorologists use to study the earth’s oceans and atmospheres and reconstruct their evolution. Labs cover seawater processes, oceanic circulation, marine life, atmospheric structure, and weather.
  
  • GEOS 105 - Exploring the Universe


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors/minors
    Examines the history of time; the reasons for the seasons; the characteristics of the planets, moons, stars, and galaxies; and the history and future of space exploration.
  
  • GEOS 106 - Exploring the Universe Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: No geoscience majors/minors
    Corequisite: Enrollment in GEOS 106 requires corequisite or previous enrollment in GEOS 105 
    Introduces the techniques astronomers use to study the nature and motions of objects in the sky, including the sun, moon, planets, and stars. Includes two observations held at night.
  
  • GEOS 111 - Earth and Environmental Systems


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 2
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Designed for freshman and sophomore students in disciplines that require a deeper understanding of the Earth’s systems, particularly science education, anthropology, geography and geoscience majors.
    Examines environmental science from an Earth systems science perspective.  Introduces the interactions between various systems that make up the Earth’s critical zone (near-surface interface between humans and our planet’s atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere).  Explores spatial and temporal variation of environmental processes through the use of hands-on data collection, manipulation and modeling.
  
  • GEOS 119 - Geology of Energy Resources


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines the geological environments that create energy resources. Compares patterns of energy development globally and nationally with particular emphasis placed on the development of Pennsylvania’s energy resources. Studies relationships of environmental impacts to current levels of energy use, both in terms of climate and water. Culminates with a look at factors that affect future energy demand in terms of population growth and standard of living.
  
  • GEOS 150 - Geology of National Parks


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors/minors
    Explores geological processes and earth history using the classic rock formations of America’s national parks. Includes national parks such as Arches, Bryce Canyon, Carlsbad Caverns, Grand Canyon, Great Smokies, Mammoth Cave, Shenandoah, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Zion, and others.
  
  • GEOS 151 - The Age of Dinosaurs


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors/minors
    A thorough introduction to dinosaurs and the world they inhabited. Topics include the most current theories regarding dinosaur biology (behavior, metabolism, evolution), ecology (greenhouse climate, associated fauna and flora), and extinction (asteroid impact, volcanism, climate change).
  
  • GEOS 152 - Physical Resources of the Earth


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: No geoscience majors/minors
    An introduction to mineral, energy, and water resources of the earth; genesis of ore depositions; exploration, exploitation, and utilization of resources; impact of exploitation of resources on the environment and on humankind.
  
  • GEOS 154 - Human Exploration of Space


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors/minors
    Covers the history, technical considerations, and scientific and social issues of the exploration of the planets and smaller objects of the solar system. Early rocketry, the race to the Moon, and past robotic missions provide a perspective to consider current and future science missions and human settlement beyond earth. Includes field observations and activities that may occur on evenings and weekends.
  
  • GEOS 155 - Geology of Climate Change


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Examines the geologic factors which control Earth’s climate; how that climate has varied through Earth’s history; how anthropogenic climate change is different from changes previously experienced on Earth; and how anthropogenic climate change is affecting the planet.
  
  • GEOS 156 - Geology of Natural Disasters


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the science behind natural disasters, including earthquakes, landslides, floods and volcanic eruptions. Students will investigate the geologic processes that impact the surface of the Earth and endanger human lives. By understanding the science behind these processes, students will learn to recognize known risk factors, minimize their vulnerability to disaster, and weigh the consequences to society of living in disaster-prone regions.
 

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