Apr 17, 2024  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Credit designation at right of title is expressed in (c) class hours per week, (l) lab or (d) discussion section hours per week, and (cr) number of credits per semester.

 

English

  
  • ENGL 361 - Environmental Literature


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 121  or ENGL 122 , ENGL 202 
    Focuses on literature devoted to natural and constructed environments, exploring connections among such topics as nature writing, environmentalism, ecocriticism, place studies, bioregionalism, and environmental justice.
  
  • ENGL 396 - The Literature of Emerging Nations


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 121 /FNLG 121  or ENGL 122 , ENGL 202  
    A comparative study of a selection of literature written in major European languages but originating in the nations of the developing world. Works are mainly prose fiction (although essay, theater, and poetry may be included) and reflect a diversity of geographical, cultural, and prior colonial circumstances. Also listed as FNLG 396.
  
  • ENGL 398 - Global Genres


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 202 
    Focuses on a specific literary genre (including, but not limited to, poetry, drama, film, the short story, or the novel) as it has been developed and transformed in global contexts beyond the typical domains of the British or American literary traditions. Situates the use of a genre within transnational literary and historical developments. The global genre studied in a particular semester to be announced in advance.
  
  • ENGL 415 - English Language Study for Teachers


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on the fundamentals of language study with equal emphasis on the sound, the word, the sentence, the meaning, and the discourse patterns of English as they manifest in daily lives. Covers relevant topics, such as applications of sociolinguistics to the teaching of English language and literature, varieties of grammar, the history of English, and linguistic descriptions of styles and registers.
  
  • ENGL 418 - Young Adult Literature


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 101 , ENGL 122 , ENGL 323 , or permission, English education major
    Introduces literature for and about young adults. Emphasizes critical study of the literature and its classification as well as resources and rationales for using young adult literature in the middle and secondary classroom. Explores selection of literature and various methods of literature instruction. (Offered as ENGL 318 before 2014-15.)
  
  • ENGL 420 - Writers’ Studio


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 220  or ENGL 221 
    An upper-division course emphasizing reading, discussion, and writing on specialized topics related to the study and performance of writing. The focus varies from semester to semester according to the expertise of the faculty member teaching the course.
  
  • ENGL 421 - Digital Writing


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 202 
    Introduces composition and presentation issues in writing for digital media. Focuses on the conventions of digital writing and provides practice in conceiving, composing, and producing networked texts and may include creative expression, persuasion, and collaboration. Extends traditional literacy skills into emergent, digital genres.
  
  • ENGL 424 - Second Language Acquisition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on how people learn and develop a second language. Explores research in second language acquisition (SLA) and focuses on the multi-disciplinary nature of second language learning and use. Concentrates on the history of SLA and how understanding SLA can affect teaching and learning.
  
  • ENGL 426 - ESL Methods and Materials


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor permission
    Introduces English as a second language theory and pedagogical practice through emphasis on multilingual students’ experiences in institutional contexts. Covers the (1) general understanding of current theory and methods of teaching ESL and the (2) ability to select, adapt, and design curricular materials for elementary and secondary ESL students.
  
  • ENGL 434 - Shakespeare


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 122 , ENGL 202 , and one of ENGL 210 -ENGL 213  or ENGL 226 
    Studies Shakespeare’s development as a poetic dramatist against background of Elizabethan stage; examines audience, textual problems, language imagery, and philosophy.
  
  • ENGL 436 - Major American Authors


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 122 , ENGL 202 ; and one of ENGL 210 -ENGL 213  or ENGL 226 
    Studies in the literary output of a major American author or authors against the background of the social and literary milieus in which the works were created. Specific subject or subjects to be announced by the instructor.
  
  • ENGL 437 - Major Global Authors


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 121  or ENGL 122 ; ENGL 202 ; and ENGL 396  
    Examines major works in English and/or English translation of a single major global author not included in the British or American literary traditions.  Situates the author within major transnational literary and historical developments.  major author to be studied in particular semester to be announced in advance
  
  • ENGL 440 - Major Figures in Film


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 121  or ENGL 122 ; and ENGL 202 , ENGL 208 
    Studies major artists and their contributions to the development of film as an art form from its beginnings to the present. Close analyses of directors, cinematographers, editors, screenwriters, or actors—as individuals or as representatives of a movement in film. Topics vary from semester to semester; thus, one semester may concentrate on a specific director such as Alfred Hitchcock; another semester might study women (as directors, actresses, and editors); and yet another semester might study a collective movement such as film noir.
  
  • ENGL 442 - Cross-Cultural Communication


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores major trends, issues, research, and exploration in cross-cultural
    communication. Introduces conceptual frameworks for understanding cross-cultural communication in and out of the classroom.
  
  • ENGL 450 - Film Theory


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 121  or ENGL 122 ; and ENGL 202 , ENGL 208 
    An introduction to major film theories, studied in relation to representative films. Details the complex relationship between film production and film theory, i.e., how theorists have attempted to explain what appears on the screen, its impact, and its relation to “reality,” and how filmmakers have responded to the works of theorists (with the two sometimes being the same). Goes far deeper into understanding film than ENGL 208 , which focuses mainly on how film is constructed through aesthetic and institutional processes.
  
  • ENGL 460 - Topics in Film


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 101 , ENGL 208 
    Selected films dealing with a specific, advanced topic are viewed and assessed to explore the different roles that film plays. Topic to be announced in advance.
  
  • ENGL 463 - Topics in Global Literature and Film


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 202 
    Examines major works in English of a particular topic in global literature and/or film by focusing on the transnational contexts of history and culture surrounding the production and/or reception of literature and film. Topic of global literature and/or film to be announced in advance.
  
  • ENGL 466 - Topics in Theory


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in both ENGL 122  and ENGL 308  
    Explores a specific issue, writer, or trend in English Studies theory.  Topic to be announced in advance.
  
  • ENGL 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Topics vary from semester to semester covering such diverse topics as autobiography, science fiction, folklore, the political novel, black theater, etc.
  
  • ENGL 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.
  
  • ENGL 483 - Honors Thesis


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite: Admission to departmental honors program; prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    An intensive, focused study involving independent research culminating in a written thesis approved by a thesis director and two faculty readers/committee members. May be taken more than once to a maximum of 6cr. Repeatable: May be taken more than once to a maximum of 6cr.
  
  • ENGL 484 - Topics in English Studies


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Declared English major; ENGL 122 , ENGL 202 ; minimum 24cr in major
    Explores themes that may vary according to the faculty member teaching the course. Gives upper-level English majors an opportunity to share their expertise in their track: Literary/Textual/Cultural, Writing, Film, or Language Studies. Students are part of a community of learners and reflect on the ways disciplinary knowledge is constructed in English studies and will construct a portfolio of their work as an English major, both in and out of this class, to assess their growth and potential as readers, writers, and critical thinkers.
  
  • ENGL 485 - Honors English Portfolio/H


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Declared English major; must be enrolled in English Honors Track; must be enrolled in ENGL 484  
    As one of the requirements for achieving English Honors, students construct an Honors version of the summative portfolio required of all BA majors. Complements the objectives and semester topic of the section of ENGL 484  in which the student is concurrently enrolled.
  
  • ENGL 493 - Internship


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3-12

    On-the-job training opportunities in related areas. Application and acceptance to internship program required.

Environmental Engineering

  
  • ENVE 101 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces the principles of environmental engineering with specific focus on water pollution and control, hazardous substances and risk assessment, water and wastewater treatment systems, air-pollution and emission control, solid wastes, and global warming.
  
  • ENVE 200 - Foundations of Geology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Geoscience majors/minors, environmental engineering, energy management, anthropology, geography, and regional planning majors, biology majors (all tracks), or instructor permission
    Introduces the geological sciences, including the study of the Earth’s interior; plate tectonics; minerals and crystallography; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and their cycling; geologic time; crustal deformation and. Laboratory exercises will emphasize hand-on learning of basic geology skills including mineral and rock identification, understanding the geometry of subsurface geologic structures, and topographic and geologic map reading. (Also offered as GEOS 200 . These courses may be substituted for each other and be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.)
  
  • ENVE 201 - Fluid Mechanics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENVE 101 , MATH 125 , PHYS 131  
    Applies basic laws of fluid mechanics with applications to engineering problems, hydrostatic pressure, buoyancy, open systems and control volume analysis, mass conservation and momentum conservation for moving fluids, viscous fluid flows, flow through pipes, and dimensional analysis.
  
  • ENVE 211 - Statics and Solid Mechanics


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENVE 101 , MATH 125 , PHYS 131 
    Examines principles of mechanics, force systems, equilibrium structures, distributed forces, centroids, stress and strain, torsion, bending of beams, shearing stress in beams, combined stresses, principal stresses, deflections of beams, and statically indeterminate members and columns.
  
  • ENVE 301 - Environmental Aquatic Chemistry


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: ENVE 101 , CHEM 112  or CHEM 114 
    Examines fundamental principles of general, analytical, physical, and equilibrium chemistry applicable to water and wastewater treatment systems. Topics include thermodynamics and kinetics of acids and base reactions, carbonate chemistry (alkalinity), air-water exchange, precipitation and dissolution, oxidation-reduction, and chemical analysis of water and wastewater in a laboratory.
  
  • ENVE 311 - Water Resources Engineering


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: ENVE 201 
    Explores hydrologic engineering, including fundamentals of hydrology, rainfall-runoff modeling, hydraulic processes (including both pressurized pipe flow and open channel flow), and hydrologic frequency analysis. These fundamentals are then applied in the computation of design flows and in the analysis and design of hydraulic systems such as pipe networks and storm water management systems.
  
  • ENVE 312 - Hydrogeology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in GEOS 200  
    An overview of groundwater geology, including flow equations, aquifer flow equation, aquifer parameter testing, groundwater sampling techniques, and remediation of groundwater pollution. Labs emphasize graphical and analytical solutions as well as computer modeling of groundwater flow systems. (Also offered as GEOS 312 . These courses may be substituted for each other and be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.)
  
  • ENVE 461 - Water and Wastewater Treatment


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 202 , ENVE 301 
    An overview of engineering approaches to protecting water quality with an emphasis on fundamental principles. Explores design of systems for treating municipal wastewater and drinking water as well as physical, chemical, and biological processes, including sedimentation, filtration, biological treatment, disinfection, and sludge processing.
  
  • ENVE 471 - Solid and Hazardous Waste Management


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 202 , ENVE 311 
    Examines the principles of integrated solid waste management. An overview of municipal solid waste (MSW), industrial waste and hazardous waste management, including design and economic analysis. Explores the planning and engineering principles needed to address the growing and increasingly intricate problem of controlling and processing the refuse (solid waste) created by urban societies. Discusses options such as landfilling, composting and incineration from engineering, social, and regulatory perspectives. Reviews physical, chemical, and biological treatment of hazardous waste. Covers federal regulations, permitting and public participation processes and innovative management practices associated with solid and hazardous waste.
  
  • ENVE 498 - Environmental Engineering


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Senior standing (90 or more credits) or instructor permission
    Capstone design experience involving an interdisciplinary environmental engineering project incorporating real-world clients. Includes visits and tours of field sites as well as interaction with professional engineers. Focuses on water treatment alternatives, regulatory operational needs, sustainability; and implementation of a realistic schedule and project budget.

Family and Consumer Sciences Education

  
  • FCSE 101 - Personal and Family Management


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Personal and family management as a system and its relationship to the global environment, individuals, and families. Formulation of goals, values, and standards; use of decision-making process; sustainability and utilization of resources.
  
  • FCSE 143 - Financial Wellness


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Theories and principles related to the physical, social, and emotional wellness aspects of individual money management. Information is focused on building a sound financial foundation as a college student and can be applied throughout the life span to ensure future financial well-being. Successful completion fulfills the Liberal Studies Dimensions of Wellness requirement. Other 143 courses will also fulfill this requirement, and any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit. This course is cross-listed with ECON 143 /FIN 143 .
  
  • FCSE 315 - Consumer Economics and Family Finance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores the decision-making process of families concerning the utilization of financial, personal, environmental, and social resources. Course content focuses on how families develop, exchange, and allocate resources throughout the lifespan. Discusses basic consumer education including an overview of financial products (e.g., insurance, credit cards), as well as laws and policies related to financial management discussed.
  
  • FCSE 350 - Teaching Family Life Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Family and consumer sciences education, child development and family relations, and disability services majors, or instructor permission
    Emphasizes teaching family life education in family and consumer sciences classrooms and through community organizations and agencies. Lessons are planned and implemented using a variety of instructional methods incorporating adaptations and modifications for special needs learners, basic skills, global concerns, and use of a problem-solving/decision-making approach. Planning of content, learning activities, instructional materials, and evaluation based on clearly stated objectives is emphasized. A microcomputer spreadsheet is utilized to manage a department budget and a grade book. Participation in professional organization activities is expected.
  
  • FCSE 450 - Teaching Vocational and Family Consumer Science Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FCSE 350 
    Emphasizes teaching vocational family and consumer sciences in consumer/ homemaking and occupational family and consumer sciences programs. Federal legislation affecting family and consumer sciences is analyzed for use in program decisions. Emphasizes program development using CBVE model, development of individual learning packets, vocational youth organizations, advisory committees, family and consumer sciences and vocational educational priorities, professional organizations, proposal development for funding, impact on public policy, marketing family and consumer sciences, and development of a personal philosophy of family and consumer sciences education.

Foundations of Education

  
  • FDED 440 - Orientation to Teaching in Urban Centers


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Provides an understanding of urban learners and their unique learning needs and conditions. Emphasizes understanding the origin of attitudes and values and how these affect the relationships that exist between students and teachers. Special attention given to practical application of theoretical information to problems of urban education.
  
  • FDED 441 - Field Experiences in Urban Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    A specialized experience for students who are considering teaching in inner-city schools. Aspects to be emphasized include physical characteristics of community, background and aspirations of children and parents, and specialized teacher competencies, classroom management, planning, instructional materials, teaching strategies, and evaluation. All participating preservice teachers receive significant exposure to English language learners and students with special needs. Schools selected for student experiences are located in Philadelphia. May be substituted for EDUC 242  with program approval and completion of Step 1 for teacher certification.

Food and Nutrition

  
  • FDNT 110 - Careers in Food and Nutrition


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Food and Nutrition major, University College students, or by permission
    Explores career possibilities in food and nutrition. Clarifies professional goals and examines educational and experiential requirements necessary to attain goals.
  
  • FDNT 143 - Current Issues in Nutrition and Wellness


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Introduces contemporary nutrition issues as they relate to personal food choices and overall health. Completion of FDNT 143 fulfills the Liberal Studies Dimensions of Wellness requirement. Other 143 courses will also fulfill this requirement, and any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit.
  
  • FDNT 145 - Personal Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Encourages students to practice and adopt food behavioral choices that can be applied to everyday life. Evidence-based information concerning weight control, nutrients, diseases, and lifecycle nutrition is presented. Appropriate for students who are not nutrition majors or minors. (Titled Introduction to Nutrition before 2014-15.)
  
  • FDNT 150 - Foods


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CHEM 101  or CHEM 103  or CHEM 111  or BIOL 104   
    Corequisite: FDNT 151  
    Basic principles of food: composition, sanitation, preparation, and preservation.
  
  • FDNT 151 - Foods Laboratory


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CHEM 101  or CHEM 103  or CHEM 111  or BIOL 104 
    Corequisite: Must be taken with FDNT 150  
    Applies basic principles of food preparation. Taken only by Food and Nutrition majors or Family and Consumer Science Education majors or by permission.
  
  • FDNT 212 - Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CHEM 102  or CHEM 103  or CHEM 112  or BIOL 104  and BIOL 106 ; sophomore standing 
    Examines sources and functions of nutrients, the interdependence of dietary essentials, and nutritive value of an optimum diet are studied. Discusses dietary risk factors to chronic diseases and varied conditions in human life. Includes emerging and alternative food and nutrition topics.
  
  • FDNT 213 - Life Cycle Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212  with a grade of “C” or better
    A detailed study of nutrition during all stages of the human life cycle; current issues and research as they impact these developmental stages.
  
  • FDNT 245 - Sports Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 145  or FDNT 212 
    Emphasizes knowledge and application of sports nutrition principles. The impact of the macro- and micro-nutrients on physical performance is discussed in light of current scientific research and applied to realistic dietary recommendation for all types and levels of athletes.
  
  • FDNT 255 - Nutrition Assessment and Medical Terminology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 150  with grade of “C” of better
    Repeatable: Selects and uses appropriate dietary, anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, functional, and socioeconomic assessment techniques to identify and prioritize nutritional needs of individuals. Applies critical thinking in determination of nutritional status. Communicates using professional standardized language, documentation, and medical terminology.
  
  • FDNT 355 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212   and FDNT 255  with grades of “C” or better and BIOL 150  and BIOL 240  with a grade of “C” or better 
    Explores pathophysiology of and evidence-based medical nutrition therapy for caloric imbalance, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Uses of food exchange systems in diet prescription and menu planning.
  
  • FDNT 362 - Experimental Foods


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in FDNT 150 , FDNT 151 FDNT 355  or concurrently, and MATH 217  
    In-depth study of foods, relating chemical and physical properties to reactions and processes. Focuses on the importance of research and evaluation techniques as they apply to product development and consumer acceptability. Examines factors impacting the quality, safety, preservation, additives, and nutritional composition.
  
  • FDNT 363 - Experimental Foods Laboratory


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: FDNT 150 , FDNT 151 , FDNT 355  or concurrently, and MATH 217 
    Examines the experimental study of foods, relating chemical and physical properties to reactions and processes occurring in food systems. Applies development, conversion, and manipulation of ingredients and recipes to meet dietary needs or preferences. Evaluation of foods using equipment and sensory methods.
  
  • FDNT 364 - Methods of Teaching Food and Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 213  with a grade of “C” or better
    Focuses on nutrition education methods to support health-promoting dietary behaviors for different populations in a variety of settings. Provides experience in the development of theory-based educational programming via assessing needs, developing objectives, creating/selecting accompanying materials and activities, implementing appropriate instructional strategies, assessment, and evaluation.
  
  • FDNT 370 - Human Food Consumption Patterns


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores human food consumption behaviors from food production to individual and societal consumption patterns. Discusses influencing factors including agronomic, economic, geographical, nutritional, political, sociological, and psychological factors. Covers also the ethics and morality of food distribution.
  
  • FDNT 402 - Community Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 212 
    Nutritional implications of both good and poor nutrition for all age groups in home and community situations are studied. Corrective and preventive measures emphasized. Taught spring semester only.
  
  • FDNT 410 - Food, Nutrition, and Aging


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Junior status
    Relationship of food to health maintenance and special dietary problems during the middle and later years.
  
  • FDNT 415 - Sustainable Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Explores food system sustainability issues from farm to fork, including food production, preparation, processing, packaging, and distribution. Assesses the sustainability of current dietary recommendations and the environmental impact of food choices. Evaluates food security from a national and global perspective.
  
  • FDNT 422 - Public Health Nutrition and Epidemiology


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 145  or FDNT 212  and MATH 214  or MATH 216  or MATH 217 , or department permission
    Identifies population-based needs and approaches for prevention and alleviation of diet-related conditions. Explores methodological issues involved in the design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation of studies investigating the relationship between nutritional status, diet, and disease. Examines the application of nutrition research related to nutrition assessment and program and policy design and evaluation to improve the nutritional status and health of diverse population groups.
  
  • FDNT 430 - Professional Topics in Food and Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 355  with a “C” or better, and senior status 
    Focuses on professional roles, skills, responsibilities, and ethics in the dietetics profession. Explores emerging perspectives and practices in dietetics including informatics, teamwork and mentoring, application of leadership and management theories to personnel and projects, career development and marketing, quality assurance, healthcare systems and delivery.
  
  • FDNT 431 - Career Advancement in Dietetics


    Class Hours: 1
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Senior status, Nutrition-Dietetics Track majors only
    Preparation to become a credentialed dietetics professional. Includes pathways to become a registered dietitian, specialized credentials and certifications, and establishing a professional network. Navigates the complex application process to secure acceptance to a dietetic supervised practice program.
  
  • FDNT 445 - Advanced Sports Nutrition


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 245 
    Examines and evaluates evidence-based sports nutrition guidelines and current research related to nutrition and athletic performance. Explores special populations, environments and clinical conditions related to nutrition and athletic performance. Includes an emphasis on dietary supplements and ergogenic aids for sport.
  
  • FDNT 455 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 355  with a grade of “C” or better
    Pathophysiology of and evidence-based medical nutrition therapy for disorders of the gastrointestinal, renal, hepatic, and immune systems, inborn errors of metabolism, cancer. Nutrition support.
  
  • FDNT 458 - Advanced Human Nutrition


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: CHEM 255  or CHEM 351 , FDNT 355 , MATH 217 
    An in-depth study of the nutrients and their function within the cell. Incorporation of the principles of physiology and biochemistry in the study of nutrition. Emphasizes applying current research and evaluation of research methodology. (Does not count toward MS degree in FDNT requirements.)
  
  • FDNT 459 - Advanced Human Metabolism: Macronutrients


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 150 , BIOL 240 , CHEM 255 , FDNT 355 , and MATH 217   with grades of “C” or better
    Examines the macronutrients and their functions within the human body. Incorporates the principles of physiology and biochemistry in the study of nutrition. Emphasizes current research and evaluation of research methodology.
  
  • FDNT 460 - Advanced Human Metabolism: Micronutrients and Water


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BIOL 150 , BIOL 240 , CHEM 255 , FDNT 355 , and MATH 217  with grades of “C” or better
    Examines the micronutrients and water, and their functions within the human body. Incorporates the principles of physiology and biochemistry in the study of nutrition. Emphasizes current research and evaluation of research methodology.
  
  • FDNT 463 - Nutrition Counseling


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 3
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 355 , PSYC 101 , FDNT 455  or concurrently
    Use of intervention strategies in prevention and treatment of disease through diet. Supervised practicum (three hours per week) counseling clientele in normal and therapeutic nutrition.
  
  • FDNT 465 - Nutrition Counseling and Education


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 213 FDNT 355 PSYC 101  
    Corequisite: FDNT 466  
    Focuses on nutrition counseling and education methods to support health-promoting dietary knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors for individuals and groups in community and clinical settings.
  
  • FDNT 466 - Nutrition Counseling and Education Lab


    Class Hours: 0
    Lab/Discussion: 2.75
    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: FDNT 213 , FDNT 355 , and PSYC 101  
    Corequisite: FDNT 465  
    Development and experience applying nutrition counseling and nutrition education methods to support health-promoting dietary knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors for individuals and groups.
  
  • FDNT 471 - Integrative Nutrition in Complementary and Alternative Healthcare


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FDNT 145 , FDNT 212  or departmental permission
    Explores the foundation of complementary, alternative, integrative, and functional nutrition theories and practices. Differentiates among traditional, complementary, alternative, integrative, and functional nutrition models as related to food, supplements, herbs, and disease. Evaluates current research related to complementary, alternative, integrative, and functional nutrition.
  
  • FDNT 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost; must have earned 60cr
    Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.
  
  • FDNT 484 - Senior Seminar


    Class Hours: 2
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: Senior status
    Emphasizes evidence-based analysis of food and nutrition research through discussion and presentation.
  
  • FDNT 493 - Internship


    Class Hours: var
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1-12

    Prerequisite: Must have earned 60cr
    An opportunity to work away from the university in supervised situations at healthcare facilities, foodservice, community, or nonprofit organizations. Students receive career-related experiences. Must meet university internship requirements. White uniforms, including white shoes, are required for all lab courses in which food is prepared. Students must meet the professional dress requirements of the department.

Fine Arts

  
  • FIAR 101 - Introduction to Fine Arts


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    An exploration of visual art, theater, and music, examining their conceptual and aesthetic underpinnings, selected works, and their primary and similar functions in the expression of cultural, political, and personal views of the world around us. Class experience includes the analysis of at least one major work of each form, attending at least two live performances, viewing of selected works, and creative activities. If it should be necessary for a student who fails this course to take a D/F repeat, any one of the following courses may be substituted: ARHI 101 , MUHI 101 , THTR 101 , DANC 102 .
  
  • FIAR 401 - Creativity and Innovation in the Arts


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Focuses on contemporary big ideas in the arts, the connections between the arts, and the place of the arts in broader society and in further cultivating innovative thinking in the arts community. Promotes student development of new ideas into viable potential directions for their future professional lives.

Finance

  
  • FIN 143 - Financial Wellness


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Theories and principles related to the physical, mental, social and emotional wellness aspects of individual money management. Information is focused on building a sound financial foundation as a college student and can be applied throughout the life span to ensure future financial well-being. Successful completion fulfills the Liberal Studies Dimensions of Wellness requirement. Other 143 courses will also fulfill this requirement, and any of these courses may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit. Cross-listed with ECON 143 /FIN 143.
  
  • FIN 300 - Personal Finance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 01
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MATH 107  / MATH 108  and ACCT 201  
    Provides an opportunity for students to gain an in-depth understanding of the importance of personal finance. It is the first course as part of a track for those who are interested in becoming a Certified Financial Planner (CFP). This course does not fulfill the Dimensions of Wellness course requirement.
  
  • FIN 310 - Fundamentals of Finance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Prerequisites for business majors: ACCT 201 , MATH 214  Prerequisites for nonbusiness majors: ACCT 201 , MATH 214  or MATH 217  (MATH 214  recommended)
    The study of valuation models, financial statement analysis and forecasting, capital budgeting methods, and working capital management. Also includes an introduction to risk and return, capital markets and institutions, and security valuation.
  
  • FIN 315 - Financial Analysis Using Electronic Spreadsheets


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BTED 101 /COSC 101 /IFMG 101  
    Develops the financial students’ computer modeling and analysis skills. Teaches how to utilize current computing resources, electronic spreadsheet, and other computing software to analyze, model, and solve a variety of financial problems.
  
  • FIN 320 - Corporate Finance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in FIN 310  
    The study of corporate financial management and decision making, its theory, and application. Provides a higher level of study and many of the same topics covered in FIN 310 , particularly in the area of capital budgeting. Other topics include capital asset pricing models, costs of capital, capital structure, leasing bond refunding, and financial distress.
  
  • FIN 323 - Retirement Planning


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 300  and FIN 310 
    Introduces retirement planning concepts from both the employer/employee and individual client perspectives, via theory based lectures and case studies. Examines the relationships between retirement plans and legal, tax, insurance, and other concepts as they relate to effective financial planning.
  
  • FIN 324 - Principles of Investments


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 310 
    An introduction to securities markets, trading, and valuation. Topics include security types and characteristics, the mechanics of trading, valuation models for fixed-income securities and common stock, mutual fund evaluation, basics of options and futures, and tax-advantaged investments.
  
  • FIN 360 - Insurance and Risk Management


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 310 
    Covers the nature of risk, the application of the risk management process to business risk management problems, and the essentials of insurance contracts and insurance markets. Discusses appropriate methods of risk control and risk financing. The primary focus is on accidental losses resulting from situations involving pure risks, although financial risk management techniques for dealing with speculative risks are introduced.
  
  • FIN 365 - Student Managed Investment Portfolio I–Valuation


    Class Hours: 1.5
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1.5

    Prerequisite: Finance and accounting majors or instructor permission
    Applies empirical and theoretical concepts to real-world portfolio management and investment decisions. Different investment strategies and valuation models are used to reinforce investment principles and practices learned in previous finance courses.
  
  • FIN 366 - Student Managed Investment Portfolio II–Performance


    Class Hours: 1.5
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 1.5

    Prerequisite: FIN 365  
    Students assess the performance of a stock portfolio managed by their peers. Performance measures focus on risk and return and include financial ratio analysis and benchmark comparisons.
  
  • FIN 400 - Estate Planning


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: At least 90 earned credit hours
    Introduces legal, tax, insurance, financial, and other principles relating to estate planning via a combination of theory-based lectures, case studies, and simulations.
  
  • FIN 410 - Financial Institutions and Markets


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 324 
    A review of the structure of financial institutions and money and capital markets. Provides the knowledge of the theory and practices of managing financial institutions, with particular emphasis on the management of financial risks.
  
  • FIN 420 - Investment Analysis


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 320 , FIN 324 
    Integrates the work of the various courses in the finance areas and familiarizes the student with the tools and techniques of research in the different areas of investments.
  
  • FIN 422 - Seminar in Finance


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 320 , FIN 324 , seniors only
    Primarily for the senior finance major, covers topics in all areas of finance by using recent articles, cases, discussions, speakers, and a financial simulation game.
  
  • FIN 424 - International Financial Management


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 310 
    The financial management concepts, useful in a single-country context, are adapted for the international variables and constraints caused by being international. Provides insight into unique issues and problems the manager of the multinational enterprise will face, such as working capital management, capital budgeting process, financing and investing abroad, capital and money markets, foreign exchange markets, and risk management.
  
  • FIN 425 - Financial Derivatives


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 320  and FIN 324  or equivalent/permission for FIN 425 and FIN 324  or equivalent/permission for FIN 525
    Provides an understanding of how the derivatives markets work, how they are used, and how prices are determined. Includes the common types of derivatives, their characteristics and properties, and trading methods and strategies. Also, covers fundamental pricing models based on arbitrage pricing theory, binomial, and Black-Scholes models.
  
  • FIN 426 - Seminar in Financial Planning


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 300 FIN 324 , FIN 400  
    Integrates coursework in various personal finance areas with actual case applications.
  
  • FIN 481 - Special Topics


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
    Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are offered primarily for upper-level undergraduate students.
  
  • FIN 482 - Independent Study


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Office of the Provost
    Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.
  
  • FIN 493 - Finance Internship


    Class Hours: var
    Credits: 3-12

    Prerequisite: FIN 310 , FIN 315 , FIN 324 ; prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, and dean; minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA; major 2.5 GPA
    Provides practical experience in the finance field to develop knowledge and provide application of theory to actual problems in a nonclassroom situation. Three credits are awarded for at least 120 hours of on-site work, up to 12cr for at least 480 work hours. A maximum of 3cr may be applied toward the finance major area elective requirements. Additional internship credits must be used as business electives only.

Study Abroad and Comparative Literature

  
  • FNLG 121 - Humanities Literature


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENGL 101  
    An exploration of literature and the methods of close reading. Through encounters with significant literary texts, students will investigate and analyze how literary meaning is constructed; how literature shapes and is shaped by its various contexts; and how literature enables critical inquiry into values. Includes literary texts by women and people from underrepresented communities.  Also offered as ENGL 121 . ENGL 121 /FNLG 121 may be used interchangeably for D/F repeats; may not be counted for duplicate credit.

French

  
  • FRNC 101 - Basic French I


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the placement test (WebCAPE score between 0 and 285)
    For beginning students. Not open to native speakers, except by special permission of department. Students must achieve an appropriate placement test score to enroll (score between 0 and 285). Special focus on aural/oral skills. Students learn in a multimedia environment. Students converse and ask questions in simple present tense. They become acquainted with elements of daily lives of native speakers of French around the world. Attendance is mandatory. May not register for, or take a D/F repeat in, FRNC 101 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered French course.
  
  • FRNC 102 - Basic French II


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: FRNC 101 , or qualifying score on the WebCAPE placement test (286-362), or instructor permission
    For beginning students. Students must achieve an appropriate placement test score to enroll (score between 286 and 362). Special focus on aural/oral skills. Students learn in a multimedia environment. Students converse and ask questions in simple present tense. They can now express commands and directions and are introduced to the expression of punctual actions in the past. They further investigate the daily lives of native speakers of French around the world. Attendance is mandatory. May not register for, or take a D/F repeat in, FRNC 102 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered French course.
  
  • FRNC 201 - Intermediate French


    Class Hours: 4
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: FRNC 102 , or qualifying score on the WebCAPE placement test (score above 362), or instructor permission
    Continued study of French; development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing, but primary emphasis is on aural/oral skills. Students use a multimedia environment to learn to converse and ask questions in the past. Students learn the different way to express completed action that occurred at a specific time in the past vs. expressing an action that continued in the past over an indefinite, undetermined period of time; students review how to narrate and describe in the past, ask and give directions, talk about the future, avoid repetitions, learn to combine simple sentences, express and understand conditional sentences, express and understand subjective statements, and understand indirect discourse. Through the use of multimedia, students continue their inquiries into the daily lives of native speakers of French around the world. Attendance is mandatory. May not register for, or take a D/F repeat in, FRNC 201 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered French course. Liberal Studies Humanities credit is given for this course.
  
  • FRNC 220 - Intermediate French Conversation


    Class Hours: 3
    Lab/Discussion: 0
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FRNC 201 , or qualifying score on the WebCAPE placement test (score above 402), or instructor permission
    Intensive work on oral communication skills with specific emphasis on spontaneous interpersonal speaking, discourse strategies, vocabulary building, and pronunciations. Required for all minors and for the French Certificate. Liberal Studies electives credit given for course. Taught in French. Students may not register for, or take a D/F repeat in, FRNC 220 when credit has already been received for a higher-numbered FRNC course.
 

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